Fiat 124 Spider Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I want to install a 3rd brake light modulator so I need to tap into the wiring for this light. Unfotunately they do not make it easy to get at the harness for this unit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
157 Posts
You may be violating Federal Law..

I want to install a 3rd brake light modulator so I need to tap into the wiring for this light. Unfotunately they do not make it easy to get at the harness for this unit.
Hi Golding. Don't want to poo poo your project , but I believe you may be violating Federal Law. Please see third ;)paragraph of attached,...Grandpa doesn't want you to do all this work, then get a ticket ...Bill

Federal law.....


In North America since 1986, in Australia and New Zealand since 1990, and in Europe since 1998, a central brake lamp, mounted higher than the vehicle's left and right brake lamps and called a "Centre High Mount Stop Lamp (CHMSL)", is also required. The CHMSL (pronounced /ˈtʃɪmzəl/) is also sometimes referred to as the "centre brake lamp", the "third brake light", the "eye-level brake lamp", the "safety brake lamp", or the "high-level brake lamp". The CHMSL may produce light by means of a single central filament bulb, a row or cluster of filament bulbs or LEDs, or a strip of Neon tube.

The CHMSL is intended to provide a deceleration warning to following drivers whose view of the vehicle's left and right stop lamps is blocked by interceding vehicles. It also helps to disambiguate brake vs. turn signal messages in North America, where red rear turn signals identical in appearance to stop lamps are permitted, and also can provide a redundant stop light signal in the event of a stop lamp malfunction.

The CHMSL is generally required to illuminate steadily and not permitted to flash,[56][57] though U.S. regulators granted Mercedes-Benz a temporary, limited exemption to the steady-light requirement so as to evaluate whether a flashing CHMSL provides an emergency stop signal that effectively reduces the likelihood of a crash.[58]

On passenger cars, the CHMSL may be placed above the back glass, affixed to the vehicle's interior just inside the back glass, or it may be integrated into the vehicle's deck lid or into a spoiler. Other specialised fitments are sometimes seen; the Jeep Wrangler and Land Rover Freelander have the CHMSL on a stalk fixed to the spare wheel carrier. Trucks, vans and commercial vehicles sometimes have the CHMSL mounted to the trailing edge of the vehicle's roof. The CHMSL is required by regulations worldwide to be centred laterally on the vehicle, though ECE R48 permits lateral offset of up to 15*cm if the vehicle's lateral centre is not coincident with a fixed body panel, but instead separates movable components such as doors.[15] The Renault Master van, for example, uses a laterally offset CHMSL for this reason. The height of the CHMSL is also regulated, in absolute terms and with respect to the mounting height of the vehicle's conventional left and right stop lamps.[59] Depending on the left and right lamps' height, the lower edge of the CHMSL may be just above the left and right lamps' upper edge.

History

The 1952 Volkswagen Bus was equipped with a center-mounted brake light in addition to the two conventional brake lights.[citation needed] The 1968 - 1971 Ford Thunderbird could be ordered with optional supplemental high-mounted stop and turn signal lights integrated into the left and right interior trim surrounding the backglass.[60][61] The Oldsmobile Toronado from 1971–1978, and the Buick Riviera from 1974-1976 had similar dual high-mounted supplemental stop/turn lights as standard equipment; these were located on the outside of the vehicle below the bottom of the backglass.[60][62] This type of configuration was not widely adopted at the time. Auto and lamp manufacturers in Germany experimented with dual high-mount supplemental stop lamps in the early 1980s,[63] but this effort, too, failed to gain wide popular or regulatory support.

Early studies involving taxicabs and other fleet vehicles found that a third stop lamp reduced rear-end collisions by about 50%. The lamp's novelty probably played a role, since today the lamp is credited with reducing collisions by about 5%.[64]

In 1986, the United States National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and Transport Canada mandated that all new passenger cars have a CHMSL installed. A CHMSL was required on all new light trucks and vans starting in 1994. CHMSLs are so inexpensive to incorporate into a vehicle that even if the lamps prevent only a few percent of rear end collisions they remain a cost-effective safety feature.[64]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
This is going to come off as sarcastic...because it is...but it is not meant as a personal attack on you Bill...honest! :)


Yeah, Yeah, Yeah, and in Massachusetts our speed limit signs still say 55 but that doesn't mean that you won't get rear ended if you try to drive 55 on the mass pike!

At the end of the day I, also being a motorcyclist...will ALWAYS try to adopt any margin I can that provides me with additional margin. In this case ( ...If I were to hypothetically also add a brake light modulator to the third light and to the two not for US rear foglights) any additional rearward facing visibility that may help keep little Cindy Lou from crashing into me and ruining her text to her besty because she caught the obnoxious flashy-flashy-flashy of my lights in her peripheral vision then SIGN - ME - UP!!! :)

Just one man's opinion.

Jay in Bahstun
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
150 Posts
Many new modules allow pulsing (PWM process) for the LED lights, which effectively negate any disallowance of "flashing" as typically flashing is defined as the on/off sequence of lights. With pulsing, you are modulating the light output and never allowing it to go completely off. Granted, it's a technicality, but that's actually what laws revolves on. It depends on the definition of "flash".

I've had similar on my bikes for several years, and have ridden through about 13 states (including California) and never had an issue with mine.
Pretty sure that even California has it written into their law that any stop lamp or supplemental stop lamp is allowed to blink no more 4 times within 4 seconds of application of the brakes.

I know here in Texas I'm seeing more and more of the "tanker" type semi's using them on the rear of their trailers. Very noticeable and it probably does help to reduce the number of DWHUA drivers that have a tendency to rear end a semi trailer.

I've lost count of the number times I had almost been rear-ended on the motorcycle, but since adding this on it people appear to be more observant. This is a programmable flash module that also will allow the California compliant flash, but as it's set it never fully cycles off. When sitting in a car behind it, it is not as noticeable as it is not directed straight towards the drivers eyes. I'm still contemplating ordering another one and putting on the third brake light of the Abarth, or modifying the two lenses on either side of the reverse light to perform the function.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you for the info on the flashing brake light law. I have always added a modulating brake flasher to my motorcycles (4 fast 4 slow always on). It was simply an extra safety precaution for me and I just took the chance that the police would never cite me for this. So far so good.
The 124 also has a small, low footprint and I feel the necessity to add the flasher simply for personal safety concerns. If the police tell me that it is illegal and want me to remove it I certainly will comply.

I have no wish to flaunt the laws of the land. I am, for the most part law abiding, but with the rash of car accidents involving distracted driving on the rise I feel the need to bring their attention level up any way I can.

Just call me a "Canadian Outlaw". :eek:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
150 Posts
I want to install a 3rd brake light modulator so I need to tap into the wiring for this light. Unfotunately they do not make it easy to get at the harness for this unit.
Easiest place to tap in is probably at the plug under the cover of the inside top of the trunk. Since I don't mind soldering, that's where I tied mine in at, simply soldering it in place and then double side taping the module in the cutout that allows access to the top of the trunk lid so that there is access to change it if I need to.
The unit is a Custom Dynamics MAGIC-STROBES-UNV.
I "borrowed" this unit from my FJR1300 as I hardly ride it any longer but will probably get another one to replace it with as I'm still debating on whether to sell it or keep it for the rare times I get out on it.

Pardon the garage mess, I still need to get the spring cleanup done - lots of stuff we've collected is going into the trash as it never gets used.


BTW, found out - if you don't have any brake lights due to a fuse blowing out, your car won't start either. :laugh:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for the video. Certainly gets ones attention. I have completed wiring my flasher (in the same manner you describe) and I am very pleased with the strobe pattern. (4 quick flashes, 4 slow flashes then always on). Followed my wife in the car and verified that the strobe effect, although they get your attention, were not what I call overly annoying.

My next project is to add lights to the red lens housings on each side of the back up light. Have yet to decide whether I will tie these into the strobe , running light, or brake light wiring.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,076 Posts
On bikes I totally agree with you, cause lots of people when they have a bike in front of them they tend to stare at it and next thing they hit the bike.

For cars it's another story, here in Canada very strict laws.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top