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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
This is a preview of our soon to be released intercooler kit.

Our intercooler is 56% larger than the stock part, plus it's a bar and plate type so these two factors combine to give far more cooling power than the factory intercooler. This is the largest intercooler every offered for this engine in any chassis.

We improved flow, not only by using a larger intercooler core, but by improving the pipes taking the charge air to and from the intercooler. The factory pipes CHOKE down to a 1.5" id, which is way too small for this engine, especially in the case of modified engines. Our pipes have smoother bends and are a minimum of 2.0" id from just after the turbo. They go up to 2.5" in some sections, and far out flow the factory parts.

Beta testing for the 124 Automatic is complete and production is starting next week. The Abarth Manual kit will go into beta testing shortly after.

Pictures in the next post.

Greg
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Here are a couple pictures of the kit on the car. It fit perfectly. This was quite a job since a lot of bends were needed, and they all had to be just right.





Greg
 

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Hi Greg, do you have an estimate on price yet? :)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
We elected to go with a single continuous piece of silicone on each side. That reduces the number of connection points, and thus the potential for leaks. The hoses have 4 plies of reinforcement and 5 layers of silicone. They are far stronger than the factory hoses, and with fewer possible leaking points, should be far more reliable as well.

This engine, like all turbo engines tends to lose a lot of performance in hot weather. A more effective intercooler can really help prevent or reduce this. On modified engines more intercooling and less restrictive plumbing becomes more important, and for the highest levels of modification, it's essential.


Greg
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hi Greg, do you have an estimate on price yet? :)
I don't have anything official yet (I have nothing to do with that part of the operation). I do know that it's a little more expensive to make than our kit for the 500 Abarth, so I would expect it to be slightly higher, but not by too much.

Greg
 

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I don't have anything official yet (I have nothing to do with that part of the operation). I do know that it's a little more expensive to make than our kit for the 500 Abarth, so I would expect it to be slightly higher, but not by too much.

Greg
Thanks Greg!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I should also mention that this intercooler kit can not be used with the stock intake system because it can't connect to the stock airbox. I don't think this is an issue because I can't really see anyone doing a big intercooler as a first upgrade, but who knows??? It will of course connect to our V2, and V4 intakes.

Greg
 

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Greg, how is the install? I can't imagine getting to the throttle body is easy.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Greg, how is the install? I can't imagine getting to the throttle body is easy.
That's a great question. Let me break it down.

1. Removal of the stock system. This is probably the hardest part. Removing the intercooler itself isn't too bad, but they used a combination of clamps and clips to attach the rubber pipes to the various plastic parts. Some of these clips are tough to get at and you have to release some of them to get the whole thing out. It's designed to go in at the factory really fast, but once the car is together it's a bit of a pain to deal with. There are three plastic sections of the intercooling piping. All are bolted to something. For the most part, those bolts are pretty easy to get at.

As you suspected, the hardest part is removing the clamp holding the rubber coupler onto the throttle body. There is just no good way to do this. I used a 1/4" drive ratchet setup, and it works, but it's awkward and takes a while. I probably spent about 2 hours getting it off, perhaps 3.

2. Installing our system. Not terrible, but not a piece of cake either. The intercooler itself if pretty easy to bolt in. The two brackets are easy to get to. The piping is pretty easy to thread into place. The driver's side is a piece of cake. The passenger side however is where all the action is. Getting that tube clamped onto the throttle body is a huge pain. There are a couple things you can remove to make it a little easier, but it's just not in a nice friendly spot. Getting the boost sensor in isn't too bad, and neither is the boost line to the intake side. All in all, installation probably takes another 2-3 hours, with most of it being for the passenger side pipe.

Greg
 

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That's a great question. Let me break it down.

1. Removal of the stock system. This is probably the hardest part. Removing the intercooler itself isn't too bad, but they used a combination of clamps and clips to attach the rubber pipes to the various plastic parts. Some of these clips are tough to get at and you have to release some of them to get the whole thing out. It's designed to go in at the factory really fast, but once the car is together it's a bit of a pain to deal with. There are three plastic sections of the intercooling piping. All are bolted to something. For the most part, those bolts are pretty easy to get at.

As you suspected, the hardest part is removing the clamp holding the rubber coupler onto the throttle body. There is just no good way to do this. I used a 1/4" drive ratchet setup, and it works, but it's awkward and takes a while. I probably spent about 2 hours getting it off, perhaps 3.

2. Installing our system. Not terrible, but not a piece of cake either. The intercooler itself if pretty easy to bolt in. The two brackets are easy to get to. The piping is pretty easy to thread into place. The driver's side is a piece of cake. The passenger side however is where all the action is. Getting that tube clamped onto the throttle body is a huge pain. There are a couple things you can remove to make it a little easier, but it's just not in a nice friendly spot. Getting the boost sensor in isn't too bad, and neither is the boost line to the intake side. All in all, installation probably takes another 2-3 hours, with most of it being for the passenger side pipe.

Greg
Thanks for the insight! Is it easier to get at the throttle body from the top or the bottom of the car?

As an aside, what's the difficulty at that point to remove the throttle body? I'd love to install the Cravenspeed spacer to have a port for a boost gauge.
 

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Nice Job!

Want it...

In our recent track testing of Fiat vs Miata we found the Fiat gets about 2 magic laps before heat soak softens the power noticeably. That leaves the driver seeking best lap time the choice of backing off for every other lap to cool the stock setup. This upgrade looks big enough to help that issue a lot.

 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks for the insight! Is it easier to get at the throttle body from the top or the bottom of the car?
You have to do it from the bottom, not only that, you have to do it from the bottom and through the wheel well. There is no other way to get to that throttle as far as I can tell. Our instructions will cover this pretty well, at least you can see it, which means we have decent pictures of the process. All in all, I guess I would say to plan on 4-6 hours for the whole job, although having already done it, I think I could now do it in three, at least if I have a helper.

As an aside, what's the difficulty at that point to remove the throttle body? I'd love to install the Cravenspeed spacer to have a port for a boost gauge.
Getting the throttle itself off would be a nightmare. I would just forget it. I am dreading having to change a throttle on this car. There are other places to tie in a boost gauge anyway, but that's another topic.

Greg
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Excited...

Can you get a picture of the front of the car with it on? One with the grill and one without if possible.
I can do that. Well...more specifically I'll have Jordan do it. He was the primary designer and fabricator of this kit and he is going to start posting here. I'll ask him to take a picture of it from the front. We are not going to take the grill off, I really don't like messing with the plastic body parts, but a picture with it all together is no problem.

It looks pretty much stock to a casual observer, but someone who really knows the 124 can look in and know there is something special going on there.

Greg
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Oh, this is a good time to mention this. Absolutely no disassembly of the front body work is required for this installation. The entire process is done from below the car. You have to remove an under car plastic piece, and the inner fender splash shields, but you don't touch any of the painted exterior surfaces. This is a really nice change from intercooler work on the other FCA cars we have dealt with.

Greg
 

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Looks great guys!

I am sure that you had a few banged knuckles from that install, it is tight under there isn't it?
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Looks great guys!

I am sure that you had a few banged knuckles from that install, it is tight under there isn't it?
Thanks Brett. It is really tight under there. However it's not as bad as that front anti-sway bar!

Greg

P.S. PM on the way
 

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Thanks Brett. It is really tight under there. However it's not as bad as that front anti-sway bar!

Greg

P.S. PM on the way
Don't get me going on the sway bar, I still have stitches from that one ha ha.
 
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