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(Newbie)If someone can point me to existing thread (cant find) or outline tips & tricks, break in post picking up new car, being turbo engine and all.
I.E. Many folks (WRX & STI Subaru owners) will run their engines few minutes warm up and pre shut down to let oil circulate warm or cool turbo.
Picking up later this week, Lusso Pkg, black (Cinema Nero) with saddle brown int.
 

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There is a break in section in the manual - you should have downloaded that by now :) There was a thread regarding the break in, but can't find its at the moment. It's not like the cars of yore.

It basically says, vary the speed, don't overload the engine (foot flat to the floor starts, etc.) for the first 1000km. There is an electric pump which circulates (something?) through and around the turbo [just taking comments at face value - but you can hear it after shutting the car off].

There's a blue temperature light when you start the car from cold. Again, don't hammer the engine until it goes off (temperature 'needle' comes off cold).
 

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There's a blue temperature light when you start the car from cold. Again, don't hammer the engine until it goes off (temperature 'needle' comes off cold).
LMAO. I have been wondering about that light since I got the car. I keep checking my oil thinking maybe I'm low. If I wasn't so Italian, maybe I would have thought to check the manual. Thanks!!!
 

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Thanks for the great feedback! Picked up the car last Friday May 12th, between yard work (Spring) and rain Sunday, put on limited mileage, but I did get to notice the sound of the recirculating pump you mention. It's reassuring now that I know what it is.
 

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Keep in mind that this is 2017; cars nowadays, even if they have 0 miles on it (which never happen, even if you order one from factory will have at least 20-30 miles on it), it does not mean that the car has never run.

In factories they test bench mechanical parts; then when assembled, the cars usually go for a small dynamo run or a test on the factory track, just in case something is defective, but it happens every thousands units built.

So technically, your "new" car is not really new, as it used to be in the past (say in 1970 or 1980); this allow you to get a premium tested product, and avoid companies expensive recall campaigns. Also if you buy from a dealer, most of the time they have cars that they use just for show, and a model that is running around dealers in the same area, used for test drives. Mine had almost 200 miles on it; because it was a demo model. This is both good and bad, since people trash demo models; but you have the warranty, and if the car has any problem, you bring it straight to the dealer (unless he give you a deal on the original price and make you sign a paper that you agree to the new conditions).

Now you can imagine that "break in the engine" is something that really has no meaning at this point in time; some people may believe that X may be needed, or Y is suggested; but most of it, is common sense. The blue temperature signal is a good thing to look at, but not only when the car is new :) You want to avoid to push the engine when the light is blue, not because you care about the coolant temperature, but because the coolant is less dense than oil engine, so if the coolant is cold, the oil engine is even colder; and you can imagine how much you hurt a cold engine when you push it.

Beside that; there is not really much to take care of; check the oil on your first 3-4 oil change, and use a magnet to see if there is any trace of metal particles; the amount of particles should be lesser and lesser, each time you change the oil. That tell you that the engine is in good shape; otherwise beware because there is grinding somewhere, and that may lead to breakage.

The noise you hear when turning off the car may also be the fan cooling off the turbine and other engine components. There is so little literature about the current 124, so I can't even tell if the car has an old school "radiator fan", since it has an intercooler.

Enjoy your car!
 

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Keep in mind that this is 2017; cars nowadays, even if they have 0 miles on it (which never happen, even if you order one from factory will have at least 20-30 miles on it), it does not mean that the car has never run.
fwiw, that's not entirely accurate. My Abarth had 3 miles on it when I went to test drive it. So I bought it :)
 

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Drive it like you stole it.
 

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fwiw, that's not entirely accurate. My Abarth had 3 miles on it when I went to test drive it. So I bought it :)
You were among the lucky ones :) No car maker is able to give you at perfect 0 miles, unless you pick it at the factory.

A car has to be moved from A to B; just load and unload on a truck few times, and the miles are added. Your car must be one of the cars used as showcase model; I was not that lucky since I was looking for an Abarth with manual transmission; so the few available were all demo models.
 

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You were among the lucky ones :) No car maker is able to give you at perfect 0 miles, unless you pick it at the factory.

A car has to be moved from A to B; just load and unload on a truck few times, and the miles are added. Your car must be one of the cars used as showcase model; I was not that lucky since I was looking for an Abarth with manual transmission; so the few available were all demo models.
Not sure what that is but it was crammed into the 4th floor storage garage in Manhattan (NY) amongst 3 red ones (which I wasn't buying). I, like you, was only buying a manual. It had me Hello ;)
And I paid for it. There was very little haggling. Supply and demand. So, I paid. Still, very happy!
 

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Someone says there's a break in section in the manual? Checked my Abarth manual front to back and didn't find one. I've been thrashing it since I bought it. Changed the oil at ~1,000 miles.
 

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Someone says there's a break in section in the manual? Checked my Abarth manual front to back and didn't find one. I've been thrashing it since I bought it. Changed the oil at ~1,000 miles.
It's under Driving Tips. From the manual:

DRIVING TIPS
Engine Break-In Recommendation
No special break-in is necessary, but a few precautions in the first 620 miles (1000 km) may add to the performance, economy, and life of the vehicle: Do not race the engine. Do not maintain one constant speed, either slow or fast, for a long period of time. Do not drive constantly at full-throttle or high engine rpm for extended periods of time. Avoid unnecessary hard stops. Avoid full-throttle starts.
 

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It's under Driving Tips. From the manual:

DRIVING TIPS
Engine Break-In Recommendation
No special break-in is necessary, but a few precautions in the first 620 miles (1000 km) may add to the performance, economy, and life of the vehicle: Do not race the engine. Do not maintain one constant speed, either slow or fast, for a long period of time. Do not drive constantly at full-throttle or high engine rpm for extended periods of time. Avoid unnecessary hard stops. Avoid full-throttle starts.
Well I broke all those guidelines LOL.
 

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I'm curious if how the engine is broken in, is effecting oil consumption on some of your engines. I've got 4000 miles on my car and the dip stick is still at the full mark. I would guess that just laying into the throttle creates the bulk of oil consumption.
 

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I'm curious if how the engine is broken in, is effecting oil consumption on some of your engines. I've got 4000 miles on my car and the dip stick is still at the full mark. I would guess that just laying into the throttle creates the bulk of oil consumption.
I drive my car hard. I've got 3000 miles on mine now, and the dipstick shows full.
 

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Used almost two quarts in my first 4000 miles. I guess my foot has heavier lead than yours.
 

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I plan on driving for 3000 miles and then changing the oil, having the filter checked for chunks of metal, sending an oil sample to a lab, and recording results in my log.
 

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Now days engines are built so much better than yesteryear's, and the oils today are beyond better. Other than common sense, drive the thing. I posted somewhere else about our 30KW generator at the farm. It has a Chevy six cylinder motor, running on propane. It goes from zero to 100% in seconds. It does this every week for a twenty minute test cycle automatically, unless of course a hurricane or such pays us a visit, and it then will run continuously until power is restored, I manually shut it off, or God forbid, run out of propane. I change the oil every spring, and the antifreeze every three years. The oil dipstick is always full, and it is not all that dirty when changing it. I buy oil filters are the local auto part store. I didn't plan to go 3000 miles on Spidy before first oil change, just not wanting to take to the dealer and let them mess around my V4 intake. I finally convinced myself to do it, not bad at all.
 

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I've had mine almost three weeks now and about 1300 miles. Dipstick still reads good. I don't put my foot into it too much yet, and I try to just use common sense in driving it for the first 3k miles. I have broken in several vehicles and it just takes common sense. I still own my first new truck, an 84 Chevy Silverado and it has 436k miles and counting.

The only difference that I do, with this being turbocharged, is I do not use the upper revs (engaging the turbo) for the last couple miles before I get home and turn it off.
 
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