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I am a big believer, especially with turbo engines, to filter the oil down to 2 microns or less. Regular filters will not do this. Anyone looked into adding a filter bypass kit?
 

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Filter bypass? I just want a filter relocation kit, to make it easier to replace the darn thing.

Back to your question, and although I have no basis of which to disagree with you, regular and routine service with high quality oil, oil filter and air filter at intervals shorter than recommended will probably go far toward meeting your goal of limiting pollutants in your oil, and engine. Probably not to 2 microns, but is 2 microns even a size detrimental to a stock gasoline engine? Is a typical OEM oil pump capable of moving oil through filter media that fine? If removing 2 microns, at what point are we removing additives from the oil itself?

For those of us not familiar with them, how is a filter bypass system achieving this 2 micron goal? Thanks.

Steve.
 

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I put one on my 1.4L Turbo Cruze. AMSOIL has a really nice kit for that. I haven't looked at what it would take to install one on this car, but I have some serious concerns regarding space. The smallest bypass filter I found on AMSOIL's side is a 1-quart filter. The thing is huge. I can't imagine where someone would install such a filter in this engine bay.
 

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Filter bypass? I just want a filter relocation kit, to make it easier to replace the darn thing.

Back to your question, and although I have no basis of which to disagree with you, regular and routine service with high quality oil, oil filter and air filter at intervals shorter than recommended will probably go far toward meeting your goal of limiting pollutants in your oil, and engine. Probably not to 2 microns, but is 2 microns even a size detrimental to a stock gasoline engine? Is a typical OEM oil pump capable of moving oil through filter media that fine? If removing 2 microns, at what point are we removing additives from the oil itself?

For those of us not familiar with them, how is a filter bypass system achieving this 2 micron goal? Thanks.

Steve.
Bypass filters use extremely fine particle filtration media that allows them to achieve an absolute filtration rating of 2 microns at about 98.7% efficiency. Note, absolute, not nominal. The bypass filter adapter has a restrictor orifice that allows a very slight amount of oil through at a given time; typically around 5% of the oil pump's total volume. Bypass filters can be set up to feed and return through an oil filter sandwich plate, which would probably have to be custom, or through a T-fitting on the oil pressure sender port, returning through the valve cover through a swivel fitting (requires drilling a hole in the valve cover or oil cap).

They're more popular on diesels since diesels are not exposed to anywhere near the levels of acidity that gasoline engine byproducts produce, and the filtration keeps soot levels under control for long (100,000+ mile) drain intervals.

Depending on conditions, you can find oil film on bearing surfaces thinning to mere single digit microns. A bypass filter eliminates contaminant-induced wear. Your typical cellulose filters like the cartridge filter on this car will filter approximately 25-30 microns depending on model and exact construction, nominal. There is a theoretical benefit to reducing turbo wear through the use of a bypass filter that does a better job of reducing contaminants.

I am extremely hesitant to recommend that anyone change their oil more often than necessary. That approach spreads misinformation through fear of the unknown. In this context, the contaminants in engine oil introduced through byproducts of gasoline combustion are inconsequential to the oil's ability to perform its tasks at the service intervals set by FCA. It would be more beneficial and prudent to get oil analysis of your oil samples to track engine wear and oil condition. The owner of any equipment they consider to be valuable should consider a regular oil analysis service as part of their maintenance routine.
 

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Thanks, XR. Can you suggest oil analysis firms of good reputation to use? And approximately how much does the process cost?

Steve.
 

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Thanks, XR. Can you suggest oil analysis firms of good reputation to use? And approximately how much does the process cost?

Steve.
The one I always use is Polaris Labs, under AMSOIL's Oil Analyzers Inc private label. Polaris Labs is an ASTM certified testing facility (another popular one, Blackstone Labs, is not), and includes nitration, oxidation, fuel dilution, and TBN testing. They also test for hundreds of other companies including ConocoPhillips, Ingersoll Rand, Cummins, and Allison.

I've found that AMSOIL's price on these kits is very good. Here's a link:

Oil analyzers Inc Test Kit, UPS Prepaid

Here's a bit more information on Polaris Labs: https://polarislabs.com/

I can post a sample report and walk you through the details if you're interested in seeing what they test and what all of the data means.
 

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I think this would likely extend engine life. I'm with you on following recommended change intervals. The short interval change promoted by oil vendors is hugely wasteful and isn't going to provide the results expected by fearful owners.
The space issue is certainly a problem though.
Best regards
Pete
 

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I can post a sample report and walk you through the details if you're interested in seeing what they test and what all of the data means.
Yes, that would be great if you could do that, maybe as a fresh topic in the technical subforum.

Thanks,
Steve.
 
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