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Yes, something is happeneing automatically after you shut down the car. Within several seconds you'll start to here a gentle whirring sound under the hood. That's something with the turbo, cooling itself off. After a couple minutes it stops.

I don't know if oil is being circulated/pumped, or if the turbo itself is just spinning (while being lubed somehow?) at a slower speed, drawing fresh air in through the intake and pushing it out the muffler. That's just a guess, I don't know how these things work. But something is going on, and it is normal.

Enjoy the ride!
Steve.
 

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No it does not. For turbo longevity give your car a minute or so to cool down with oil passing thru the bearings. That's time well spent. I've owner turbo's since my first Saab 900 in the Early 80's and always used this process with never having a turbo fail. No expert but this works for me. It gives me that little extra time to listen to my wonderful GWR exhaust.
 

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The car continues to pump coolant through the turbo after you shut the car down.
 

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It's one of the reasons why the car has a nearly 40 lb battery...
 

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the factory installed a turbo oiler which runs after the engine is shut down. I wish they had that function on my 80 mercury capri rs turbo. fuel injection would have been nice too (it would have saved me three #4 pistons).
 

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If the car cool down the turbo, there is some reason behind for design. I order turbo blanket but now I have concern about install.
 

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The car does NOT circulate oil after shut down. Once the engine stops, oil pressure falls to zero. If the turbo is still spinning, that's bad. There is a tiny electric coolant pump that runs after shut down but that won't save the bearings if the turbo is still spinning. This isn't a problem, just drive normally with only light throttle for the last minute or two before you park and it will be fine.

Greg
 

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The other day, while getting to my car this guy was sitting in his Ferrari and noticed the engine was running and still parked, asked him why he had not left, before some old Ladies complain of too much carbon monoxide in the garage, he said HE HAS TO LET THE ENGINE RUN FOR AT LEAST 8 MINUTES, to let the turbo and liquids warm up, cause engine is in the back the the coolant radiator are in the front.
 

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Yes...this is exactly right!!..when

The car does NOT circulate oil after shut down. Once the engine stops, oil pressure falls to zero. If the turbo is still spinning, that's bad. There is a tiny electric coolant pump that runs after shut down but that won't save the bearings if the turbo is still spinning. This isn't a problem, just drive normally with only light throttle for the last minute or two before you park and it will be fine.

Greg
You know you are close to home, or near your destination, non spirited normal driving will not spin up the turbo to a high RPM, thus allowing cooler oil to circulate and lower the temp. Also, once you are parked, sitting with the engine on in idle will also allow the turbo to cool. I learned this many many moons ago, with my good old iron dinosaurs from the 60's. ;);)
 

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Just coasting to my place and getting into indoor garage, I would say a minute is gone already, and this is driving in 1st not even touching the gas pedal.
 

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The other day, while getting to my car this guy was sitting in his Ferrari and noticed the engine was running and still parked, asked him why he had not left, before some old Ladies complain of too much carbon monoxide in the garage, he said HE HAS TO LET THE ENGINE RUN FOR AT LEAST 8 MINUTES, to let the turbo and liquids warm up, cause engine is in the back the the coolant radiator are in the front.
I don't own a Ferrari, but I am pretty sure he is wrong.

Greg
 

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Greg's posts on this one are accurate. The coolant pump circulates coolant to cool the turbo down after you shut the engine off. There is no oil pressure, and the turbo is not spinning at this time. I usually let the engine run for as long as it takes me to put the top up, roll the windows up, and grab my phone and wallet. The oils we use are of far higher quality than were in common use when we had to let engines idle for minutes on end to cool the turbos down.
 

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Cars need to be

The other day, while getting to my car this guy was sitting in his Ferrari and noticed the engine was running and still parked, asked him why he had not left, before some old Ladies complain of too much carbon monoxide in the garage, he said HE HAS TO LET THE ENGINE RUN FOR AT LEAST 8 MINUTES, to let the turbo and liquids warm up, cause engine is in the back the the coolant radiator are in the front.
Warmed up UNIFORMLY, I.E....the engine, the radiator, the oil, the rear end, the transmission, and I could go on and on... I agree with Greg, ..I think the Ferrari guy was pulling your leg.;);)..

I don't run hard until the little blue light has been off and the temp gauge is at normal operational temperature.
 

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I've noticed that if I let the car idle for a minute or so before shutting it down, I don't get the electric motor/coolant sound. If I just pull in and shut down, I do. I guess it is looking at either temp or idle time or something...
 
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