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I have the first available EuroCompulsion catch can...I am giving it an early test...the unit should be available on their website first thing Monday morning...all parts appear to be very high quality...the hoses are excellent and will take a good bend without collapsing....all parts seem to be sized properly for the inlet and outlet...install time about 10 minutes...very simple for everyone...take a look at the pics below...I will answer any questions I can and I am sure EuroCompulsion will chime in...;)
 

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Looks good. I just checked my can after about 50 miles: bone dry. I'll be heading to Texas next Thursday and will check it again then.
 

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I have the first available EuroCompulsion catch can...I am giving it an early test...the unit should be available on their website first thing Monday morning...all parts appear to be very high quality...the hoses are excellent and will take a good bend without collapsing....all parts seem to be sized properly for the inlet and outlet...install time about 10 minutes...very simple for everyone...take a look at the pics below...I will answer any questions I can and I am sure EuroCompulsion will chime in...;)
I'm jealous :laugh:
 

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I have the first available EuroCompulsion catch can...I am giving it an early test...the unit should be available on their website first thing Monday morning...all parts appear to be very high quality...the hoses are excellent and will take a good bend without collapsing....all parts seem to be sized properly for the inlet and outlet...install time about 10 minutes...very simple for everyone...take a look at the pics below...I will answer any questions I can and I am sure EuroCompulsion will chime in...;)
Come ooooooooon, Monday!
 

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I can't help but wonder why worm drive hose clamps were used. Those types of hose clamps have a nasty tendency to loosen over time, especially in regions where hot and cold cycles can present a temperature change of over 200 degrees F. You may not see enough pressure for it to matter, but it would still bother me if it was my engine bay.

I would recommend that you source appropriately sized spring-style hose clamps such as the one in this link:

https://www.amazon.com/Hilmann-Made-Spring-Action-Clamps/dp/B0156WBPEQ/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&qid=1489805656&sr=8-8&keywords=spring+hose+clamps

Spring style hose clamps guarantee constant pressure regardless of temperature change as they can adjust for thermal expansion and contraction.

Just something I noticed that I felt was worth mentioning.

Aside from that, looks great!
 

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I can't help but wonder why worm drive hose clamps were used. Those types of hose clamps have a nasty tendency to loosen over time, especially in regions where hot and cold cycles can present a temperature change of over 200 degrees F. You may not see enough pressure for it to matter, but it would still bother me if it was my engine bay.

I would recommend that you source appropriately sized spring-style hose clamps such as the one in this link:

https://www.amazon.com/Hilmann-Made-Spring-Action-Clamps/dp/B0156WBPEQ/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&qid=1489805656&sr=8-8&keywords=spring+hose+clamps

Spring style hose clamps guarantee constant pressure regardless of temperature change as they can adjust for thermal expansion and contraction.

Just something I noticed that I felt was worth mentioning.

Aside from that, looks great!
I can give several reason. First of all, I hate those springy clamps. I guess that's the main reason.

The clamps we used are very good. Not only are they stainless steel, upon close inspection a sharp observer will notice that they are not normal worm clamps. The difference is that they do not have serrations that can dig into the hose materiel. That not only protects the hose, it allows the clamps to be tightened a little more. They also have very strong box sections allowing for serious tightening.

This design of clamp is so good that it's perfectly safe on smaller diameter intercooler piping (up to about 2.5") and won't loosen up enough to allow any leaks, and that's with 25 pounds of boost.

The hoses in this application don't even need clamps at all. There is almost no pressure in there, and the hoses are sized correctly for the fitting, so I feel that those clamps are total overkill. However if anyone wants to use different clamps, that's certainly OK with me, but I have been using these stainless steel protector clamps for about 20 years with no issues.

Greg
 

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Pure and JFern, good job getting it installed. You will find that in normal driving not much oil will even make it into the separator. It needs to go uphill to get there, so often it will simple go back into the engine. In the stock configuration it goes downhill, right into the intake.

You only need to open it up when you change the oil, and then it will only be about 10% full if that. It's pretty big for the application.

Greg
 

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Nice, something for me to consider as an upgrade when my car finally arrives. Boy, I've been learning a lot in the past day or so with some of these fresh conversations, thanks to all!

I'm not techy about such things, so pardon my question. These hoses, they are rated to have motor oil in them without any degrading of the hose material? I realize the total amount of oil is scant, in the form of vapor that eventually condenses and collects, but still... From auto shop class 30 years ago I recall being taught to not let dipstick drippings get on the radiator hoses for fear of degrading the rubber. Yes, a different time, and likely different blends of rubber compounds in the hoses.

Lastly, those are some long lengths of hose being used. What supports them, or secures them in place, as they snake across the engine bay? With such length, can they have a tendancy of wanting to move about some, creating scuff wear to themselves or to whatever they lay across?

Thanks,
Steve.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I can't help but wonder why worm drive hose clamps were used. Those types of hose clamps have a nasty tendency to loosen over time, especially in regions where hot and cold cycles can present a temperature change of over 200 degrees F. You may not see enough pressure for it to matter, but it would still bother me if it was my engine bay.

I would recommend that you source appropriately sized spring-style hose clamps such as the one in this link:

https://www.amazon.com/Hilmann-Made-Spring-Action-Clamps/dp/B0156WBPEQ/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&qid=1489805656&sr=8-8&keywords=spring+hose+clamps

Spring style hose clamps guarantee constant pressure regardless of temperature change as they can adjust for thermal expansion and contraction.

Just something I noticed that I felt was worth mentioning.

Aside from that, looks great!
I can give several reason. First of all, I hate those springy clamps. I guess that's the main reason.

The clamps we used are very good. Not only are they stainless steel, upon close inspection a sharp observer will notice that they are not normal worm clamps. The difference is that they do not have serrations that can dig into the hose materiel. That not only protects the hose, it allows the clamps to be tightened a little more. They also have very strong box sections allowing for serious tightening.

This design of clamp is so good that it's perfectly safe on smaller diameter intercooler piping (up to about 2.5") and won't loosen up enough to allow any leaks, and that's with 25 pounds of boost.

The hoses in this application don't even need clamps at all. There is almost no pressure in there, and the hoses are sized correctly for the fitting, so I feel that those clamps are total overkill. However if anyone wants to use different clamps, that's certainly OK with me, but I have been using these stainless steel protector clamps for about 20 years with no issues.

Greg
I agree with Greg....hoses are sized appropriately and probably don't even require a clamp..,however these are by far the best worm clamps I have seen...they are wider than usual...smooth on the inside...and you can really tighten them up...the box is the strongest I have seen....no stripping or popping loose is going to occur..,they are built to last....
 

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The can itself looks good but the placement.... really don't like that. It screams aftermarket, out of place, gerry rigged, not professional. Is there a better location?
 

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I am having a hard time understanding the placement. Above the outputs fighting gravity and the hose connections facing out instead of forward makes the need to have the hoses extra long.


I am installing the V4 intake and the GWR battery mount. Seems like this might give enough space in that area below the outputs and with MUCH shorter hoses.
 

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I'm not techy about such things, so pardon my question. These hoses, they are rated to have motor oil in them without any degrading of the hose material? I realize the total amount of oil is scant, in the form of vapor that eventually condenses and collects, but still... From auto shop class 30 years ago I recall being taught to not let dipstick drippings get on the radiator hoses for fear of degrading the rubber. Yes, a different time, and likely different blends of rubber compounds in the hoses.
Hi Steve, good question. This hose is compatible with oil. You could literally use it as oil line provided the temperatures and pressures involved were within limits.

Have I ever mentioned that I own a hose company? Well, I do, in fact we have the largest selection of silicone hose in the US, if not on the planet. This non silicone hose was made specifically for this application. Here are my sites: https://www.hpsimotorsports.com/ and http://hiperformancestore.com/ (note: anything we make for newer Fiats is sold through Eurocompulsion)

Lastly, those are some long lengths of hose being used. What supports them, or secures them in place, as they snake across the engine bay? With such length, can they have a tendancy of wanting to move about some, creating scuff wear to themselves or to whatever they lay across?
They are secure because they are connected at each end. They really can't go anywhere, and they are thick so they won't ever wear through. If you are really worried about it, I suppose you could zip-tie them but it's not necessary.

Thanks,
Steve.
You're welcome.

Greg
 

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The can itself looks good but the placement.... really don't like that. It screams aftermarket, out of place, gerry rigged, not professional. Is there a better location?
You can certainly place it somewhere else if you would like. I think that's the best spot, but a certain amount of creativity is allowed :)


I am having a hard time understanding the placement. Above the outputs fighting gravity and the hose connections facing out instead of forward makes the need to have the hoses extra long.

I am installing the V4 intake and the GWR battery mount. Seems like this might give enough space in that area below the outputs and with MUCH shorter hoses.
If you want to put it somewhere else, that's OK. I like this location. There is no drawback to the longer hoses and gravity is working for us here. It's also a very easy spot to get too for both installation and servicing. Facing forward offers no functional advantage (although shorter hoses would cost a little less), but because the mounting holes are machined into the catch can, it simply fits better this way with this particular bracket.

Greg
 

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this was the exact spot where my remote oil filter was located on my '99 Miata ...oh for the days when changing oil was so much easier.
 

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I can give several reason. First of all, I hate those springy clamps. I guess that's the main reason.

The clamps we used are very good. Not only are they stainless steel, upon close inspection a sharp observer will notice that they are not normal worm clamps. The difference is that they do not have serrations that can dig into the hose materiel. That not only protects the hose, it allows the clamps to be tightened a little more. They also have very strong box sections allowing for serious tightening.

This design of clamp is so good that it's perfectly safe on smaller diameter intercooler piping (up to about 2.5") and won't loosen up enough to allow any leaks, and that's with 25 pounds of boost.

The hoses in this application don't even need clamps at all. There is almost no pressure in there, and the hoses are sized correctly for the fitting, so I feel that those clamps are total overkill. However if anyone wants to use different clamps, that's certainly OK with me, but I have been using these stainless steel protector clamps for about 20 years with no issues.

Greg
Surely you can see why I recommended the spring type clamps though. While the worm drive clamps may be adequate, the spring style clamps are the best way to do it in applications that require clamping force, and they guarantee that the hoses are not over-tightened (more of an issue with plastic fittings). I hated them too until I discovered how easy it was to work with them with spring hose clamp pliers. This is a tool that every home garage mechanic should have in their toolbox as these clamps are in wide use in coolant hoses, and I feel somewhat ashamed that it took me 15 years of wrenching to discover that it even exists. I agree that in this specific application, it's not going to matter since the barbs provide enough sealing pressure over the stretched hose, but I get OCD about this kind of stuff and doing things the right way as opposed to the good enough way.
 

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Xtreme, I get it, if you like spring clamps then by all means use them. I just don't like them. They catch on everything when working on the car, usually sleeves, removing them requires removing the hose, and when you take them off they tend to shoot across the shop into whatever you recently painted. Yes, the special pliers will help, but I would rather just avoid them in the first place.

Now, with all that said, I do understand why some people like them. Heck, there are people that T-Bolt everything, and that's fine too.

Greg
 

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Can someone tell me why Fiat would not include a catch can as part of the standard equipment if it's so indispensable? Are they cutting corners for the sake of price over performance?

Having zero mechanical aptitude, what's the benefit of installing it & what's the downside to not doing so?
 

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Just took a trip with the new catch can....350 miles of desert and mountain driving...several pedal to the floor 90 mph runs...to top it off 98 degree heat on the way home...catch can performed flawlessly...pulled V1 intake tube assembly off to only find a small drop of oil on the turbo housing lip(most likely left over oil sucked back up into the inlet tube)...the catch can had just a film inside of it...now normally after a drive like this I would have some oil that would be running down the V1 tube into the expansion groove...nothing...this is what I hoped for...once the system gets cleaned out form the leftover oil in the intercooler and it's lines I think I will have a almost completely dry system...I will keep you informed as I put more miles on it and next week convert back over to my V4 intake system....
 

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Can you tell us about the construction of the can and its internals?
 

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Can someone tell me why Fiat would not include a catch can as part of the standard equipment if it's so indispensable?
It's not indispensable, it's just nice to have on modified cars that see a lot of full throttle, high rpm duty. Fiat did include an air:eek:il separator from the factory that drains back into the engine. It's not as efficient as I would like, but it's certainly good enough for most.


Are they cutting corners for the sake of price over performance?
I wouldn't say it that way. All cars are built to a price point. Every car on the market could be improved at some cost. Obviously the 124 isn't a cost is no object type of car, but it's built well and offers very good value for the dollar, at least in my view.

Having zero mechanical aptitude, what's the benefit of installing it & what's the downside to not doing so?
The primary benefit is anti-knock. Oil in the intake contributes to knock. This reduces it. Is that important on a stock engine? Not really. So the upside is that on a modified engine you have less chance of knock, and less oil gets into your intake. so everything stays neater. The downside is cost, and there is one extra thing to deal with at every oil change.

Greg
 
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