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Discussion Starter #1
I read something interesting on page 178 of my 2018 User Guide (i.e. Owner's Manual) and thought I might make a suggestion to those of you who are performing your own oil changes while the vehicle is still under warranty. The Manual contains an important limitation that could affect your ability to have Fiat honor its warranty in the event you have an engine problem: it reads:
Note: Under no circumstances should oil change intervals exceed 10,000 miles (16,000 kilometers) or 1 year.​
To continue New Vehicle Limited Warranty eligibility and to protect your investment, it is your responsibility to properly maintain your vehicle according to factory recommended schedules outlined in this Owner’s Manual. As part of this you must keep your maintenance records, receipts, repair orders and any other documents as evidence this maintenance was performed. You must present these documents, should any New Vehicle Limited Warranty coverage disagreement occur. Failure to do so can result in your New Vehicle Limited Warranty being voided either in whole or in part.​
This evidence may consist of the following:​
___ Original copies of repair orders or other receipts that include the mileage and date the vehicle was serviced. Each receipt should be signed by a qualified automotive service technician.​
___ For self maintenance, a statement that you completed the maintenance yourself, displaying mileage and the date the work was performed. Also, receipts for the replacement parts (fluid, filters, etc.) indicating the date and mileage must accompany this statement.
Note: If you elect to perform maintenance yourself or have your vehicle serviced at a location other than an authorized dealer, FCA requires that all fluids, parts and materials must meet FCA standards for durability and performance as described in this Owner’s Manual.Claims against the warranty resulting from lack of maintenance, as opposed to defective materials or authorized FCA workmanship, will not be honored.​

For those forum members who prefer to do their own oil changes, it is critical that you create a paper trail by documenting your work so that FCA or the dealer cannot dishonor the warranty should you develop an engine issue during the warranty coverage period. I don't know a lot about working on cars, but I do know how to prepare a self-serving "statement" that could be used by you to prove that your self-maintenance met Fiat's requirements for warranty coverage as it appears in the Owner's Manual. The following written statement should be prepared by you every time you perform an oil and filter change and kept with your Spider's maintenance records:
__

OWNER'S CERTIFIED STATEMENT OF SELF-MAINTENANCE
I, __, certify the following as true and correct:
(printed name)

1. I am the Owner of a 201____ FIAT 124 Spider, VIN # _. (hereinafter "Vehicle")

2. During the warranty coverage period, I performed an oil change to the Vehicle on ____________20_, at ___ miles or ____ kilometers using _ quarts/liters of 5W-40 synthetic motor oil. I also replaced the engine's oil filter at this time,

3. In doing so, I used a full synthetic motor oil meeting FCA Material Standard MS-12991. The brand of the motor oil was __ and the oil filter manufactured by ____ specifically for use with this Vehicle.

4. Receipts showing the dates purchased and the amounts paid for the motor oil and oil filter are attached hereto.


CERTIFIED on this __ day of ___, 20_____.


___
Signature

___
Printed Name


___


This written statement should be sufficient to comply with the requirements set forth in the Owner's Manual. Don't forget to attach your receipts to the statement. I hope that some of you will find this helpful.
- Retiree

DISCLAIMER OF LIABILITY: The above does not establish an attorney-client relationship nor is it intended by me, or to be relied upon by you, as legal advice or to suffice as an absolute guarantee that FIAT will honor its Limited Warranty Coverage should you decide to perform self-maintenance on your vehicle during the manufacturer's warranty coverage period.
 

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2019 124 Lusso
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I fully understand where you're coming from. On the same note, has anyone had an oil-related failure of their engine occur yet?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I fully understand where you're coming from. On the same note, has anyone had an oil-related failure of their engine occur yet?
Probably not, but I just wanted to throw out a CYA suggestion for those who do their own maintenance. If my post proves helpful to just one forum member, then it was worth pointing this out. I just wanted to make things easier for Spider owners who might not be as cautious as me or take adequate measures to corroborate/document their maintenance. Personally, I don't change my oil, so this won't become an issue for me, but I understand that many Spider enthusiasts on this r forum do their own. Having read about about some of the problems members have experienced with less than satisfactory dealerships, I wanted people to be aware of this "Gotcha!"
 

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2018 124 Spider Abarth Custom
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I fully understand where you're coming from. On the same note, has anyone had an oil-related failure of their engine occur yet?
The dealerships will look for ANY reason to deny the coverage if they can and its up to you to prove otherwise unfortunately. My situation is a prime example of shoddy troubleshooting and taking the easiest way out to deny coverage even though I knew it wouldn't be covered because of the tune I couldn't remove alone. As soon as they pulled the spark plugs and saw that they weren't MOPAR branded, they wrote it up as non-OEM plug failure overheated the piston and cracked it. That wasn't the root cause at all, but that is all they needed to deny the repair and asked me to cover $11.5k to order an entire powerplant and put everything back to stock.

Oil is a big factor is this car. Not just for general lubrication, but it is what makes the MA brick function properly and part of the emissions system.
 

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There were failures on early units in 2010-2013 due to wrong or too little oil. There was a collation of all the failure reasons on the early Giulietta forums

 

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Interesting stuff........Long time since 2010 and Best New Small engine of the year, many updates and modifications "evolution" so today's units are pretty stable "if" you follow the basics...FULLY Synthetic oil A MUST and that MUST show ACEA C3 on the can. 5w-40 is the recommended grade, myself i use 5w-30 Mobil 1 and have email statments from Mobil and Opie Oils to back up that that oil meets all required standards just has lower operating 30 degree rather than 40 degree. The choice of oil is also interesting, Manufacturers recommend but cannot force you to you one particular oil company... Spark plugs, filters ect......I have always done my own servicing, however, whilst under warranty I buy and take the CORRECT parts to my local garage for them to fit and STAMP the book stating that they used ONLY manufacturers parts and followed the schedule.
ANY failure, not just engine where incorrect parts, servicing occured you can whistle for your under warranty repair and that is fair enough. There is soooo much relevant and correct information within this website from our Specialist Traders and Experienced Members that, again...No Excuses...You just need to ask the question and "The Lads" fall over themselves to assist, just ask BEFORE you do the damage / bodge the job. Again, with my 50+ years of crubbing around, wallowing in oil and metal as a Motorcycle and Car enthusiast I still on occasion ask for input from my fellow members as do others so.....
Retiree's statement of, if he reaches only one member with this thread then that is a success stands for us all......
keep it coming...Cheers
ron
 
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18 Abarth 6MT, all the options, Chipbox and OEM Abarth fender badges. Pedalbooster not installed
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Retiree, thank you for all the effort and information for the DIY group here. Excellent and extremely useful IMHO.
Personally while under the warranty I have the dealership do my regular maintenance and keep all the work orders with my other records going back to the original purchase order. While it's more expensive it's relatively cheap insurance against the to be expected manufacturer denial of any claim for warranty coverage. Thanks again. 👍
 

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Most vehicles have a paper manual where you can write in the service performed/date, etc. this vehicle doesn’t have one, it seems. I found that quite annoying, for some reason (Or maybe I was annoyed I couldn’t find it...)
 

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My friend writes up work orders for himself every time he does maintenance on his car. I just keep the receipts and note the service performed, mileage, date, and product/qtys used.
 

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Yes thanks for the template. I am at about page 30 now of stuff for my car - all mods, receipts, garage work, my own work, everything. So this'll come in handy.
 

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If you sign up on the official MOPAR site, you can add your car by VIN to your garage and then add your maintenance records there. Dealership work will show up also, remind you when major services are due, etc. There is also a smartphone app, My Fiat, that is tied to that.
 

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I have always created a couple of ring bound books for each and every vehicle I own, and I'm a firm believer in that they have value (my wife argues the point, but it's one of those "we'll agree to disagree" kind of things).

They're printed half letter size in portrait mode (ending up being a landscape format, final size 8.5" wide by 5.5" tall). One is the fuel log, and the other is a maintenance log. In addition to the maintenance log, I retain a three ring binder in which all the dealer service documents and receipts are stored, and cross reference by date with th emaintenance log book.

As for oil changes, my dealer's service team provides me with the oil and filter per vehicle spec and document the odometer reading when I do so. Their records show the oil and filter change service work has been performed. ....and I do my changes every 5 to 6,000 km. What I've learned here is that my dealer is a rarity compared to the norm. Though the sales staff are clueless when it comes to Fiat vehicles, the service team is excellent. The service manager is into modding and performance upgrades; his team understand what I'm doing; and he has one service technician who deals with pretty much all my work that I require of them... and that tech does a lot of work (including adding tunes) to his own vehicle... so we're all on the same page.

Regardless of who does the work, I fully agree that record keeping and documentation of work performed is a must. Great post.
 
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Discussion Starter #13
I have to second CD Pond's claim that keeping a maintenance log adds to the value of the car. I have kept maintenance logs on my cars for almost 30 years. Here's what I do. I use a folder with a two hole clip on each side. On the right side I keep every one of my service receipts in chronological order with the latest on top. On top of the service records, I have a maintenance log which I created on my computer. It has three columns -- Date, Odometer and Description of Service. Every time I have work done on my car, I make an entry and print out the current log. On the left side, I keep the purchase invoice from the dealership, the window sticker from the vehicle, registration, Certificate of Title, and the original marketing brochure. Everything is kept in one folder making it very easy to find things and stay organized.

The maintenance log that I keep serves two purposes. First, it makes it easy for me to quickly glance at the car's service history without having to read through a stack of receipts. I even note things such as when the wiper blades were changed or key FOB batteries replaced. It helps me to quickly discover that the tires need rotation, that its time to flush the brake fluid or determine that those after-market xenon bulbs lasted only 13 months. It has also helps me to safeguard against unnecessary services recommended by a less than scrupulous service advisor. A few times I've had a new service advisor tell me that I unnecessarily need to replace my serpentine belt or cabin air filter. Once you've produce such detailed records the embarrassed service advisor learns that he should not attempt to over sell you in the future.

Second, being able to produce such a detailed and organized record of the car's service history to a prospective buyer or the used car sales manager at a dealership is a plus too. Every time that I have sold a car privately, the first person to see the car, bought it at my full asking price. I think the maintenance file I keep let's a buyer (or her boyfriend, father, brother or husband) have confidence in knowing that my car has been well-maintained. After all they can see the frequency of when work was done by reviewing my maintenance log

When I purchased my Spider in August 2019, I traded in my wife's 2007 KIA Optima EX 4 cylinder with 149,000 miles. The salesman produced some official looking appraisal report showing my car make/year/model had a MSRP of $19,500 and a trade in value of $1200. I reached into my folder and removed the original window sticker revealing a MSRP of $24,295. I then told the salesman that I no longer wanted him involved in this negotiation and to send over his sales manager. I then produced the window sticker and my maintenance log pointing out the many Kia dealership-performed automatic transmission fluid changes every 30,000 miles and oil changes every 5,000, etc. and letting him see the neatly arranged two inches of dealership service receipts. The sales manager had five techs look over the car and later told me that they could not find a single thing wrong with it. He then doubled my trade in allowance to $2,500. Interesting story. huh?

I'm not trying to blow my own horn, but I do want to attest that keeping detailed records can make it much easier to keep track of your car's history and also increase its selling price when it's time to trade or sell.
 

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Interesting stuff........Long time since 2010 and Best New Small engine of the year, many updates and modifications "evolution" so today's units are pretty stable "if" you follow the basics...FULLY Synthetic oil A MUST and that MUST show ACEA C3 on the can. 5w-40 is the recommended grade, myself i use 5w-30 Mobil 1 and have email statments from Mobil and Opie Oils to back up that that oil meets all required standards just has lower operating 30 degree rather than 40 degree. The choice of oil is also interesting, Manufacturers recommend but cannot force you to you one particular oil company... Spark plugs, filters ect......I have always done my own servicing, however, whilst under warranty I buy and take the CORRECT parts to my local garage for them to fit and STAMP the book stating that they used ONLY manufacturers parts and followed the schedule.
ANY failure, not just engine where incorrect parts, servicing occured you can whistle for your under warranty repair and that is fair enough. There is soooo much relevant and correct information within this website from our Specialist Traders and Experienced Members that, again...No Excuses...You just need to ask the question and "The Lads" fall over themselves to assist, just ask BEFORE you do the damage / bodge the job. Again, with my 50+ years of crubbing around, wallowing in oil and metal as a Motorcycle and Car enthusiast I still on occasion ask for input from my fellow members as do others so.....
Retiree's statement of, if he reaches only one member with this thread then that is a success stands for us all......
keep it coming...Cheers
ron
I don't see any of the 5w-40 Chrysler MS-12991 approved oils that have an ACEA C3 rating. All are ACEA A3/B4 rated.
 

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Direct from Mobil:
Recommended for your
2019 Fiat 124 Spider

Based on what you've told us, your vehicle manufacturer recommends a 5W-40 viscosity and oil that meets Chrysler MS-12991. We currently do not offer any motor oils in the United States that meet these specifications.
 

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So Mobil doesn't offer anything. Penzoil Euro Premium Synthetic meets that spec though, right? And if memory serves, Extreme Revolution mentioned an AMSOIL product that met spec as well. There must be a few different options out there...
 

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No mobil 5w40, only 5w30 I think. They do have the right spec though as Brexit said. Amsoil, penzoil (which I think is shell here ) have products.
 
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Havoline ProDS
Motul X-cess*
Ravenol VST
Amsoil European*
Shell Helix Ultra
Total Quartz 9000
Liqui Moly Leichtlauf*

*claims they meets specs. but not on label
 

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I'd use what's on post 1 of that
 

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Direct from Mobil:
Recommended for your
2019 Fiat 124 Spider

Based on what you've told us, your vehicle manufacturer recommends a 5W-40 viscosity and oil that meets Chrysler MS-12991. We currently do not offer any motor oils in the United States that meet these specifications.
We have had this conversation very recently.....UK, ...not USA. WE do not have Amsoil or any of those products you listed earlier like Haveline, Ravonol.Total Quart,Liqui readily available, we have Highly Recommended and Widely used "Castrol" as our Big seller, Shell Helix has been knocked by many enthusiasts on forums as not up to the job whilst Motul is known as a Motorcycle product in general here so "Castrol" is our Number one product. Mobil 1 is more expensive and used as the standard oil in many competitive Motor Sports at all levels and is "MY" choice having used it since the 1980's without issue. MS 12991 is nothing other than a Fiat code, it is not an oil spec as is ACEA C3 which is "The" spec we "Must" use to meet the requirements. As Boddle has pointed out the UK Mobil 1 engine oil is 5w-30, meets all specification requirements to operate safely and smoothly with the absolute minimum of wear "Tested and Proven" by Mobil Oils in the 1980's on a 40000 mile complete engine strip that showed No wear whatsoever, they extensively advertised that statement through UK media, convinced me to change from Castrol (who did not try to match that claim) to Mobil 1 for my CVH 1.6 Lt engined Ford XR3i which I kept 16 years, was best performing standard engine of 20 club cars at "Interpro" Dyno Bristol mid 1990's and at 40000 miles I did indeed have it inspected and performance checked again getting 111 hp from a 105 hp standard engine.
I fully accept that "Amsoil" is the "Bees Knees" engine oil out West and that 5w-40 is the recommended oil, however...again 40 just means the higher operating temperature which for the USA with it's higher temperatures is fair enough, whereas...the UK where 30 degrees would be unusual for most parts is the standard Motor Oil higher temperature .
So, We have different motor oils and other products, different operating temperature recommended oils but all MUST follow the Fully Synthetic ACEA C3 codes to get the safest and best results from our cars. My letters from Mobil Oils & Opie Oils Cornwall UK were in response to my question of could they confirm that Mobil 1 5w-30 Fully Synthetic engine oil was safe for use in my specified vehicles, the response was YES as it meets ACEA C3 requirements. Cheers
ron

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