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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I promised I would try and write-up my swaybar installation notes. I’ve attempted to boil down this to ‘just’ a few steps – with a few hindsight lesson learned at the end. Please note that any reference I make to drivers/passenger sides is done with the steering wheel on the proper/correct side of the car (rhd UK car) :D

Step 1 - Prep
Raise the front of the car, remove the wheels and place safely onto axle stands. Remove the under-tray and both front wheel arch covers (10mm, 12mm + lots of the plastic lugs with the pull-out centres)


Step 2 – Remove the drop-links
The top nut connecting the drop links to the OEM swaybar was too corroded for me to remove easily – so I just left them connected to the swaybar. I then went on to carefully remove the nut from the bottom of the drop-links (14mm ring spanner and 5mm allen/hex key in the end of the bolt to stop it turning). In hindsight, if these were also too corroded I would have just “hacksawed off’ the bottom bolt holding the drop-links as I ended up replacing the drop-links with these upgraded ones anyway. I think the photo might be the top-link at the rear - but it shows how to undo the nut..


Step 3 – Prep stuff so you can swing the steering column out & down out of the way of the swaybar.

3a. Set free the cable ties holding the wiring to the steering rack (I used a large screwdriver to lever them off).


3b. Remove the two mounting bolts holding the steering column to the subframe (19mm – I think). I was surprised to find the passenger side nut was not retained on top of the steering rack, so be careful to remove the nut from the top of the steering column and keep it in a safe place to re-install later.




3c. Remove the horn and plastic cover from the passenger side of the steering rack. Remove the plastic cover and earth strap from the driver’s side of the steering rack.





3d. Undo the nut holding the ABS wire on both the passenger and drivers side. This stops any damage when fighting (carefully) with the swaybar on its route in/out of the car.


3e. Disconnect the lower coolant hose clip (I used pliers to push the clip tabs together) and catch (most of the) anti-freeze in a bucket to either dispose of responsibly at your local recycling centre – or re-use the stuff you caught in the bucket when re-filling the coolant system. Now you can lift the plastic hose support that clips over the front of the steering rack and pull the passenger side of the steering rack towards the front of the car and then when it clears the sub-frame you can lower it on the passenger side by about 5cm – which creates enough room to clear the swaybar when removing and installing the shiny new one.




Step 4 – remove the oem swaybar, and place the new shiny one in position ready to bolt-on
I sawed the rubber mounting from the passenger side of OEM swaybar to make some more wriggle room (not sure if this was necessary – but it made it easier). Unbolt the swaybar brackets and then carefully extract the swaybar out through the driver’s side – this needs careful manipulation as it’s tricky but it can be done. I was concentrating / cursing too much and didn’t have enough hands to take any photos of this stage. However, I was following the route in the pictures 18-22 in this Eibach guide. Carefully position the new shiny swaybar through using the same route (via the drivers side in a UK car) and make sure it’s orientated the same way as the OEM bar.







Step 5 – Bolt-on the swaybar
Grease the new shiny swaybar mounting with the provided grease, and bolt them on (14mm ring spanner and open ended spanner for the top nut). This is a tight squeeze to get the bracket over the top bolt, but it will fit. Adjust the upgraded drop-links to the same length as the OEM ones, then bolt the drop link to the top of the swaybar and secure the bottom of the droplinks (using an open-ended 14mm spanner and 14mm socket)



Step 6 – Put all the stuff you removed back

6a. Put back the passenger side of the steering rack back into position and bolt it up (using the nut you carefully saved from the top of the steering rack), re-attach the coolant pipe, plastic covers, horn, wiring clips, earth strap and abs wire retaining nuts.




6b. Put either new mixed anti-freeze (or re-use the stuff you caught in the bucket) back into the car. Ensure the heating control is on max heat. I filled it by taking the hose off coming from the bottom of the engine block to the expansion tank and sticking a funnel in the end of it….there’s probably a much better professional way of doing this 
6c. Put the front wheel arch covers back, along with the under tray. Put the wheels back on, lower the car – now allow yourself a small smile the front swaybar is done!


Lessons Learned (using the power of hindsight)
1. I didn’t have to remove and re-install the tie-rod ends (as suggested in the Eibach guide). Removing these was a real pain as well, as the thread spun with the nut when I tried to remove and re-attach the nut. I used the ball-joint splitter (turned upside down) to add tension to the joint, this enabled me to loosen and tighten the nut. You’ll need to use the ball-joint splitter the right way round to split the tie-rod ends. But there's no need to do this at all. 

2. I didn’t have to worry about the steering column position. Although I did mark it up and removed the bolt, this was not necessary on UK spec car – the drivers side of the steering rack can remain in place – so no alignment worries 
3. When undoing the drop-links, I thought my 5mm hex/allen key was too big to put into the end of the threads on the bolt to stop it turing with the nut. I ended up trying to use an imperial one (~4.7mm). The 5mm isn’t too big, just work it carefully into the end of the thread (after using lots of WD40), then use the 14mm spanner to carefully take the nut off whilst holding the hex/allen key. You could re-use the oem drop-links, but mine were too rusty so I replaced them with upgrade ones.
4. I didn’t need to remove the Intercooler hose support bracket (on the driver’s side above the steering rack). This was a pain as well, as I had to undo and re-attach this support by feel. There should be enough wriggle room to remove the swaybar without removing this support bracket.
5. I need to find out how to fill and bleed the coolant properly. There must be a better way of doing this. I ended up filling it back up by detaching the hose from the engine to the bottom of the expansion tank (at the expansion tank end), sticking a funnel in the of this pipe, lifting it above the engine and filling it with anti-freeze.

Assumptions
I assume that the same trick can be done with LHD cars, the steering rack should be the other way round, so just moving the passenger (lhd) part of the steering rack out and down should provide enough clearance over the steering column motor – whilst leaving the driver’s side attached. But I can’t be sure, as mine is RHD – sorry.

I would just like to add a big THANK YOU to SJW and Greg (from EC) for their help via this fab forum during my install.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Just for completeness, here are my rear swaybar installation notes:

Now the rear swaybar, this is just bolt-off/on
1. Raise the rear of the car, remove the wheels and put on axle stands
2. Spray lots of WD40 on the toplink of the drop-links where it joins to the swaybar. Carefully remove the top the nut (with 5mm allen/hex key and 14mm spanner)


3. Remove the swaybar mounts


4. Use the supplied grease, grease the new mounts and use the new supplied brackets to attached the swaybar


5. Attach the new swaybar to the top of the drop links (5mm hex key and 14mmspanner)


6. Put the rear wheels back-on, lower the car


For the rear swaybar, you could just follow the Eibach guide
 

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Very good job. Thank you for doing this. I wish your pictures were a little larger and of higher quality, but they work.

What are your driving impressions after the changes?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Sorry, the photos were taken on my phone and I was working alone. I agree some of my photos are a little poor.

The difference in handling is superb. I'm still on standard Lusso dampers/springs so the ride quality is still lovely and smooth and clearance for road surfaces is still great, but the lean into and around corners is reduced. It's still there, but very much reduced. I think I might change the settings on the swaybar a notch (I've got it on the soft setting at the moment) and see what that does. A job for next weekend I think, but at least this job should be a five min one :)
 

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Wow, thanks for posting this great write up. I know how much longer the job takes when you have to stop and take pictures and notes.


Greg
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I realized I should have posted a photo of the steering rack dropped by about 5cm on the passenger side, as this is what you are aiming to do to remove and install the front swaybar. Here is the photo....

 

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Nice write-up, thanks for taking the time to do it. I have done a few of these and this is not a fun job. Probably worth the effort though.
 

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Very much worth the effort! Great write-up, by the way.

In the US models, at least swapping out my OE bar for the Cusco (not sure how much different other bars might be) I didn't need to mess with the steering rack. It was just a bit of a puzzle to work it carefully out one side. After doing the front, I felt like the rear bar was almost as easy as just throwing it at the car, lol!
 

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Very much worth the effort! Great write-up, by the way.

In the US models, at least swapping out my OE bar for the Cusco (not sure how much different other bars might be) I didn't need to mess with the steering rack. It was just a bit of a puzzle to work it carefully out one side. After doing the front, I felt like the rear bar was almost as easy as just throwing it at the car, lol!
I installed the Eibach and I think they may be a little beefier. I definitely had to drop the rack.
 

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I installed the Eibach and I think they may be a little beefier. I definitely had to drop the rack.
That's why I mentioned mine was the Cusco bar. It was C L O S E ! The Eibach bar is pretty beefy, so I'm not surprised. Reading some of the ND forums before starting, there were people talking about chopping the OE bar for removal. I think that would only work if you were putting on one of those bars that has the end "legs" that clamp on. Otherwise, cheating to get the stock bar off doesn't help you get the new bar on.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I went up a notch today. Feels amazing and no harsher than the softer setting. It's much much flatter into and around the corners. This is how it should have come from the factory. Even the steering feels better...I'm very pleased with this upgrade. The car feels awesome
 

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I went up a notch today. Feels amazing and no harsher than the softer setting. It's much much flatter into and around the corners. This is how it should have come from the factory. Even the steering feels better...I'm very pleased with this upgrade. The car feels awesome
Hi, thanks for all the info, did you buy the sway bars in the UK?
 

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Mods - could we move this thread to the DIY section?

Thanks for the write-up.
 

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I just used your instructions (in conjunction with Eibach's and Progress Technology) to install my Progress Technology front swaybar!
Thanks so much for your help, it was invaluable. It took about 5 hours at home in my garage with jack stands.
Lessons Learned for my install.

The Steering rack has to come out, no questions.
The tie rod ends DO NOT have to be removed (which the Eibach instructions tell you to do)
Take a picture of your steering coupling and paint a line COMPLETELY across the connection including the universal joint. It took an extra hour to redo the steering because I was one spine off when I had reassembled.
The radiator hose did not need to be disconnected. There were a couple of small bolts holding the hose support which when removed allowed enough movement to remove the steering rack.
There were also several small plastic pieces I removed to allow easier removal of the sway bar and I did hack up the passenger side rubber sway bar bushing. (what a pain, that thing was glued to the sway bar).
Basically it was a lot easier then I was expecting. The key was just take your time and read all the given instructions.
Thanks again Jowster!
Paul
 

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I promised I would try and write-up my swaybar installation notes. I’ve attempted to boil down this to ‘just’ a few steps – with a few hindsight lesson learned at the end. Please note that any reference I make to drivers/passenger sides is done with the steering wheel on the proper/correct side of the car (rhd UK car) :D

Step 1 - Prep
Raise the front of the car, remove the wheels and place safely onto axle stands. Remove the under-tray and both front wheel arch covers (10mm, 12mm + lots of the plastic lugs with the pull-out centres)


Step 2 – Remove the drop-links
The top nut connecting the drop links to the OEM swaybar was too corroded for me to remove easily – so I just left them connected to the swaybar. I then went on to carefully remove the nut from the bottom of the drop-links (14mm ring spanner and 5mm allen/hex key in the end of the bolt to stop it turning). In hindsight, if these were also too corroded I would have just “hacksawed off’ the bottom bolt holding the drop-links as I ended up replacing the drop-links with these upgraded ones anyway. I think the photo might be the top-link at the rear - but it shows how to undo the nut..


Step 3 – Prep stuff so you can swing the steering column out & down out of the way of the swaybar.

3a. Set free the cable ties holding the wiring to the steering rack (I used a large screwdriver to lever them off).


3b. Remove the two mounting bolts holding the steering column to the subframe (19mm – I think). I was surprised to find the passenger side nut was not retained on top of the steering rack, so be careful to remove the nut from the top of the steering column and keep it in a safe place to re-install later.




3c. Remove the horn and plastic cover from the passenger side of the steering rack. Remove the plastic cover and earth strap from the driver’s side of the steering rack.





3d. Undo the nut holding the ABS wire on both the passenger and drivers side. This stops any damage when fighting (carefully) with the swaybar on its route in/out of the car.


3e. Disconnect the lower coolant hose clip (I used pliers to push the clip tabs together) and catch (most of the) anti-freeze in a bucket to either dispose of responsibly at your local recycling centre – or re-use the stuff you caught in the bucket when re-filling the coolant system. Now you can lift the plastic hose support that clips over the front of the steering rack and pull the passenger side of the steering rack towards the front of the car and then when it clears the sub-frame you can lower it on the passenger side by about 5cm – which creates enough room to clear the swaybar when removing and installing the shiny new one.




Step 4 – remove the oem swaybar, and place the new shiny one in position ready to bolt-on
I sawed the rubber mounting from the passenger side of OEM swaybar to make some more wriggle room (not sure if this was necessary – but it made it easier). Unbolt the swaybar brackets and then carefully extract the swaybar out through the driver’s side – this needs careful manipulation as it’s tricky but it can be done. I was concentrating / cursing too much and didn’t have enough hands to take any photos of this stage. However, I was following the route in the pictures 18-22 in this Eibach guide. Carefully position the new shiny swaybar through using the same route (via the drivers side in a UK car) and make sure it’s orientated the same way as the OEM bar.







Step 5 – Bolt-on the swaybar
Grease the new shiny swaybar mounting with the provided grease, and bolt them on (14mm ring spanner and open ended spanner for the top nut). This is a tight squeeze to get the bracket over the top bolt, but it will fit. Adjust the upgraded drop-links to the same length as the OEM ones, then bolt the drop link to the top of the swaybar and secure the bottom of the droplinks (using an open-ended 14mm spanner and 14mm socket)



Step 6 – Put all the stuff you removed back

6a. Put back the passenger side of the steering rack back into position and bolt it up (using the nut you carefully saved from the top of the steering rack), re-attach the coolant pipe, plastic covers, horn, wiring clips, earth strap and abs wire retaining nuts.




6b. Put either new mixed anti-freeze (or re-use the stuff you caught in the bucket) back into the car. Ensure the heating control is on max heat. I filled it by taking the hose off coming from the bottom of the engine block to the expansion tank and sticking a funnel in the end of it….there’s probably a much better professional way of doing this 
6c. Put the front wheel arch covers back, along with the under tray. Put the wheels back on, lower the car – now allow yourself a small smile the front swaybar is done!


Lessons Learned (using the power of hindsight)
1. I didn’t have to remove and re-install the tie-rod ends (as suggested in the Eibach guide). Removing these was a real pain as well, as the thread spun with the nut when I tried to remove and re-attach the nut. I used the ball-joint splitter (turned upside down) to add tension to the joint, this enabled me to loosen and tighten the nut. You’ll need to use the ball-joint splitter the right way round to split the tie-rod ends. But there's no need to do this at all. 
https://youtu.be/075FSTwFl6M

2. I didn’t have to worry about the steering column position. Although I did mark it up and removed the bolt, this was not necessary on UK spec car – the drivers side of the steering rack can remain in place – so no alignment worries 
3. When undoing the drop-links, I thought my 5mm hex/allen key was too big to put into the end of the threads on the bolt to stop it turing with the nut. I ended up trying to use an imperial one (~4.7mm). The 5mm isn’t too big, just work it carefully into the end of the thread (after using lots of WD40), then use the 14mm spanner to carefully take the nut off whilst holding the hex/allen key. You could re-use the oem drop-links, but mine were too rusty so I replaced them with upgrade ones.
4. I didn’t need to remove the Intercooler hose support bracket (on the driver’s side above the steering rack). This was a pain as well, as I had to undo and re-attach this support by feel. There should be enough wriggle room to remove the swaybar without removing this support bracket.
5. I need to find out how to fill and bleed the coolant properly. There must be a better way of doing this. I ended up filling it back up by detaching the hose from the engine to the bottom of the expansion tank (at the expansion tank end), sticking a funnel in the of this pipe, lifting it above the engine and filling it with anti-freeze.

Assumptions
I assume that the same trick can be done with LHD cars, the steering rack should be the other way round, so just moving the passenger (lhd) part of the steering rack out and down should provide enough clearance over the steering column motor – whilst leaving the driver’s side attached. But I can’t be sure, as mine is RHD – sorry.

I would just like to add a big THANK YOU to SJW and Greg (from EC) for their help via this fab forum during my install.
Hello,
I've might have missed it,
Which hole did you use to connect the sway bar to the end link ?
Inner (stiffer) or outer (softer) ? did you use the same setting from and rear?
Thanks Patrick
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Initially I used the softer setting, but changed it to the harder setting, which is perfect t for UK roads. I have standard Lusso springs, suspension and wheels with Pzero tyres 225/45/17
 

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Initially I used the softer setting, but changed it to the harder setting, which is perfect t for UK roads. I have standard Lusso springs, suspension and wheels with Pzero tyres 225/45/17
Thanks a lot,
BTW I was able to install the Eibach swaybar (LH drive car) WITHOUT having to remove the steering rack..

Good Guide!
PATRICK
 
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