Fiat 124 Spider Forum banner
21 - 40 of 47 Posts

·
Registered
2019 124 Spider Abarth
Joined
·
342 Posts
$3.20 for 93 at Costco in Houston!
 
  • Like
Reactions: SteveP.

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Discussion Starter · #23 ·
We need to stop comparing everything to last year. Nobody drove last year, and everything throttled back. Exploration, pumping, refining, storing....and takes a while to bring things back. Pretty sure crud prices are dropping already. We'll be fine.
Crude oil price 1/31/20 $21.95 10/01/21 $83.57 11/17/21 $ 78.04 Lets hope it keeps going the right direction. But that isnt the one that we are paying. We are paying at the pump. And even though that price goes down does not necessarily mean that it will go down at the pump. I tend to believe its going to continue to go up with the inflation thats going in the wrong direction here in the US. Time will tell.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
682 Posts
Crude oil price 1/31/20 $21.95 10/01/21 $83.57 11/17/21 $ 78.04 Lets hope it keeps going the right direction. But that isnt the one that we are paying. We are paying at the pump. And even though that price goes down does not necessarily mean that it will go down at the pump. I tend to believe its going to continue to go up with the inflation thats going in the wrong direction here in the US. Time will tell.
Although I do agree gas will continue to go up for the short term, I believe the biggest reason for the increase is transportation.
Meaning, truck drivers.

My son is a 25+ year over the road trucker. He has been working no stop since the pandemic started.
He had his first two accidents, ever, this past month.
Wrecked his own truck, and a rental.
He is depressed, unhappy, and is sitting out the holidays, and probably a few weeks beyond that.
Not sure if he will continue.
 
  • Wow
Reactions: Aldo

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Discussion Starter · #25 ·
$7.14 (equivalent) for standard unleaded in the UK, about 70% of which is tax. I do always chuckle when I see/ hear Americans ‘complaining’ about gas prices. @Dancap I’m not sure you can blame your government for this one, the global market price for oil has nearly doubled due to high post pandemic demand, once supply catches up things will settle down I am sure.
Talk about getting it put to ya. 70% is insane. Aint a whole lot you can do about it except stop driving. Thats something Im lucky with. I only drive for pleasure. And you know in what. Work, stores, church almost everything is in walking distance. So the price going up does not affect me as much as others Still, who wants to pay more for anything? And as far as post pandemic, its going stronger here than before. More people have died this year by October 5th than all of last year. 2020 352,000 already this year as of October 5th 353,000 as reported by Johns Hopkins U. Covid is far from over. And with winter upon the US its gonna get worse.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,068 Posts
WTI (West Texas Intermediate) is the benchmark in North America.... well..... western North America anyway. And over the past year it's been bouncing all over the place, but mostly due to volatility in both the supply chain as well as demand. Certainly demand for heavy products like diesel has gone up, but mostly due to the amount of goods shipped by truck during the pandemic. More people staying home, working from home, not going out as much, and the trucks and drivers all working their tails off to get the goods delivered. The two big factors that come into play are environmental issues that result in refinery shut downs or slow downs, and the swings in demand from the average non-commercial driver. Changes in government policies often result in either increased or decreased travel, as well as the seasonal travel factors (how safe do people feel travelling to other parts of the country to see friends and family, and how will that play out at Thanksgiving and Christmas time). So refineries will try to meet demand but not over-produce and stockpile if they can avoid it, and if government policies and usage patterns change without much notice, then the supply chain drives what the market will bear. I personally don't envision any market stability until at least next summer, and between now and then I would suggest that any swings in product pricing (up or down) isn't as much a trend as a failed forecast in demand. Supply will attempt to correct, and if the correction goes too far in one extreme or the other, the price at the pump will fluctuate again.

That all said and done, the price at the pump is impacted by the change in the price of crude on international markets... but only to a relative degree. On average (in North America) the cost of what you pay at the pump is broken out by these base cost percentages:
50% cost of crude
18% refining, distribution, and marketing costs
32% federal, jurisdictional, and municipal taxation

And this latter category is climbing, especially in countries where carbon taxing is occurring. I wasn't able to find stats on the UK and Europe, but suspect the base cost of crude in their "price at the pump" make-up, is closer to 30%, and the taxation portion hitting closer to the 50% margin. Plus, we have to remember that the content of that barrel going into the system will get fractionated out into a wide variety of products, ranging from lubrication oils at the bottom end, up to the things like naptha... and nasty old benzene... nearer the top. On average, that 42 gallon US BBL of sweet WTI is only going to yield 19 gallons of gas.... and 10 gallons of diesel The other 13 gallons make up all the other products that get produced.

Where I'm going with this long-winded story is that yes, changes in the price of crude will impact the cost at the pump, but not in a proportional amount. If crude goes up 20%, the price at the pump would go up less than 10%... and with our friends on the other side of the Atlantic, that 20% cost of crude increase would (or should) result in less than a 5% shift in the price at the pump.

Semi-related aside. I wonder what places like Saudi will look like in the post carbon-based fuel world? Where I live (Alberta, Canada), we struggle at times with the transition to a non-fossil fuel based economy, but our existence is no where even close to the level of reliance that the OPEC nations face.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Aldo

·
Registered
Joined
·
847 Posts
Although I do agree gas will continue to go up for the short term, I believe the biggest reason for the increase is transportation.
Meaning, truck drivers.

My son is a 25+ year over the road trucker. He has been working no stop since the pandemic started.
He had his first two accidents, ever, this past month.
Wrecked his own truck, and a rental.
He is depressed, unhappy, and is sitting out the holidays, and probably a few weeks beyond that.
Not sure if he will continue.
So sorry to hear. You must feel devastated for your son.

Driving a truck is a hard job, both physically and emotionally, and truck drivers shouldn’t have to work long long hours to make a decent living.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Discussion Starter · #29 ·
$9 a gallon for Super fuel (98Ron 5%ethanol), 64% is tax. And $66 of road tax a month just for owning a spider. But ey, roadquality is unprecedented.
(and $145 for health insurance)
Ouch!!! How is road tax figured? MPG, miles driven ,value of car? My health insurance for my wife and myself 2 years ago was 1900.00 per month for basic coverage. Nor are we high risk. Nice thing about walking and riding my bike, helps with my health along with the pocket book.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Although I do agree gas will continue to go up for the short term, I believe the biggest reason for the increase is transportation.
Meaning, truck drivers.

My son is a 25+ year over the road trucker. He has been working no stop since the pandemic started.
He had his first two accidents, ever, this past month.
Wrecked his own truck, and a rental.
He is depressed, unhappy, and is sitting out the holidays, and probably a few weeks beyond that.
Not sure if he will continue.
With the pipelines being shut down the oil and oil products are now required to be trucked and trained more that before. What happened to your son is terrible. Probably forced to work to many hours which leads to slower reactions. And with the roads turning into the wild wild west, makes it really tougher for an already tuff job. Two of my brother in laws are truckers driving propane. They are both going to retire on Jan 1. They have had enough of the free-for-all. Take care of your son the best you can.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,760 Posts
British Columbia just imposed fuel rationing for 11 days as a result of all highways being cutoff with multiple slides and flooding. Private vehicles are limited to 10 gallons per visit; all non-essential travel is prohibited.

I was planning to take the Jeep; we were going to go off-roading up Squamish Valley. I guess that plan’s now off.

I think I’ll be taking the Fiat Spider instead; I can get 30 MPG without even trying.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,068 Posts
British Columbia just imposed fuel rationing for 11 days as a result of all highways being cutoff with multiple slides and flooding. Private vehicles are limited to 10 gallons per visit; all non-essential travel is prohibited.
I was planning to take the Jeep; we were going to go off-roading up Squamish Valley. I guess that plan’s now off.
I think I’ll be taking the Fiat Spider instead; I can get 30 MPG without even trying.
Good plan, but better still, just don't go there at all if you don't absolutely need to be there. I'm not saying that to be nasty or confrontational. BC is pretty much in a state of emergency as the main highway connecting it with the rest of Canada has serious damage in several locations, including at least one washed out bridge. I believe there are now rail issues as well. So the ships continue to offload cargo in Vancouver, but getting it out of the province is becoming problematic. People are missing due to the mud slides, and many have lost their homes due to flooding. The best thing we can do to show support is not going there and consuming resources and accommodations that families in need are struggling to access. My heart goes out to those affected, and if you have family there, I hope they manage to get through this unscathed. Rough times, especially with Christmas just a few weeks away.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,760 Posts
Good plan, but better still, just don't go there at all if you don't absolutely need to be there. I'm not saying that to be nasty or confrontational. BC is pretty much in a state of emergency as the main highway connecting it with the rest of Canada has serious damage in several locations, including at least one washed out bridge. I believe there are now rail issues as well. So the ships continue to offload cargo in Vancouver, but getting it out of the province is becoming problematic. People are missing due to the mud slides, and many have lost their homes due to flooding. The best thing we can do to show support is not going there and consuming resources and accommodations that families in need are struggling to access. My heart goes out to those affected, and if you have family there, I hope they manage to get through this unscathed. Rough times, especially with Christmas just a few weeks away.
My brother and his wife have been stuck in the BC interior for one week without a way to get back home. My dad’s turning 91 on Tuesday; least I can do is be there with him.

Dad’s only 35 miles from me, on the other side of the border. Any off-roading will definitely need to wait for another time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
For what it's worth, as of today (and converted from CAD per litre to US dollars per US gallon), in Calgary we're paying what equates to $4.95 USD per US gallon for 91 octane ($1.649 CAD per litre). Our prices are always about 20 ~ 25% higher than what's paid south of our border, but it's still a drop in the bucket compared to gas prices in Europe. But to get the cheapest dinosaur juice (yes, I know technically that's an inaccurate comment, but I like the sound of it)... the mid-east is where fuel is extremely cheap. Egyptians and Saudis pay about a third of what we do in Canada, and those lucky Kuwaitis pay about 20% of what we do.

Every time I want to whine about the high cost of fuel, I have to remember that it's our government that's taking 30% in taxes at the pump, and that in other parts of the world, the prices can easily be double what I'm shelling out at the pump. It also goes a long way in explaining why huge SUVs and pick-ups are so popular in North America.

Alberta gets the cheap fuel $1.78 a litre for 91 octane here in Toronto. :cautious:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
682 Posts
Paid $3.05 for regular today, (for our Ford), at a Shell in Knoxville, TN. Of course I had $0.10 per gallon off in Kroger reward points...LOL.. :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
138 Posts
Happy Thanksgiving Day from the U.S.

$5.15/gal. for Top Tier premium (91 octane) in Laguna Beach, CA, USA. About $1.22/gal. of which consists of federal and California state gasoline excise taxes and state and local sales tax. Sales tax is charged on the $0.8538/gal. in federal and state excise taxes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
110 Posts
I have a 2019 Abarth, and just received a recall email for the fuel pump but parts not available at this time. Have any one received the email?Posting this on this link because I failed to find it in the webpage, but if it is and I just missed it, please let me know. Thanks
 
21 - 40 of 47 Posts
Top