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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
How To Install Turbo Thermal Blanket​

Overview:
Turbo thermal blankets are used to wrap the exhaust side of the turbo and replace the OEM heat shield. While the heat shield does a decent job of reflecting radiant heat, a turbo thermal blanket is much more effective. Turbo thermal blankets have the benefit of reducing under-hood temperatures (which reduces heat soak and intake air temps), as well as extending the life of surrounding components. By keeping all of the heat inside the turbo, a turbo thermal blanket also keeps energy inside the turbo, which aids in making power by spooling the turbo faster and making it more efficient. This tutorial provides instructions for installing the Madness Autoworks Fiat 124 Spider Thermal Blanket.

Notes:
- Do not attempt to install the Thermal Blanket while the turbo is still hot as you may burn yourself.
- The Thermal Blanket may emit some smoke during the first few trips after installation, equivalent to a recently extinguished candle. This is normal and will subside after a several heat cycles.

Tools Required:
- 10mm wrench
- Ratchet with 10mm & 12mm sockets
- Ft/lb torque wrench
- Optional: in/lb torque wrench

Part Required:
Madness Autoworks Fiat 124 Spider Thermal Blanket

Procedure:
1. Remove the engine cover. There are three rubberized mounting points, shown below. Simply pull up on the cover, and it will snap out.


2. Remove the 10mm nut holding the O2 sensor bracket on.


3. Remove the following 12mm nuts and bolts.


4. Remove the three 10mm bolts shown below. Use a 10mm wrench for the lower bolt. Once removed, you can lift the heat shield and set it aside.


5. Remove the 10mm bolt shown below.


6. Fit the Thermal Blanket over the turbo.


7. Tuck the Thermal Blanket over the side of the heat shield bracket.


Continued in next post...
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
8. Using the bolts that came with your Thermal Blanket, loosely tighten the two upper bolts. Use one of the bolts you took off in step 4 where indicated below toward the bottom right.


9. Using the third bolt provided with the Thermal Blanket or one of the bolts from step 4, loosely tighten the bolt at the side, then tighten all four bolts to approximately 25-30 in/lb (hand snug).


10. Reinstall the turbo bracket, and tighten the bracket bolts shown to 18 ft/lb.


11. Reinstall the O2 sensor bracket, and tighten the 10mm nut to approximately 25-30 in/lb (hand snug).


12. Peel off the protective cover on the SILA Concepts plate.


13. Reinstall the engine cover.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Top Effort !!

Does this forum have a How To stickies ?? It should
Even better, it has a how-to section! That's where this thread is. It's titled DIY/Tutorial.
 

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Nice job on the tutorial, thanks.

1st message, photo 5, below the single bolt you ID to remove, there is some sort of sensor(?) with wires coming out of it. The next photo, #6, as you are setting the blanket, we see the sensor going through a hole in the blanket. Did that sensor need to be removed, then fit the blanket, and then reinstall the sensor? Or does the blanket somehow wrap around that sensor without having to remove it?

Secondly, you really had that little smoke? In the other biggie turbo blanket thread (sorry for not linking that thread, please edit to insert it if possible) reports of smoke from this exact blanket are wide ranging, from minor smoke to grave concern from smoke nearly billowing out of the engine bay. Has the mfr. or supplier given any more in-depth information as to what is leading to the smoking? I am not starting a debate, I sincerely want to know what it is that is burning off, and why more with some of their blankets and less smoke with other samples. I will be installing one from the beginning of my ownership but I want to be a fully informed consumer of honest information.

Thanks for you effort here, much appreciated.

Steve.
 

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Well, I guess this helps a bit, from the product description page at Madness (partial copy only),

-Titanium Fabric Outer Shell
-Calcium Magnesium Silicate Wool Inner Core
-High Temperature Silica Fabric
-Stainless Steel Capstan Rivets
-1 year manufacturer warranty against defects

Heat tolerance specs:

Interior Surface:
Maximum Temperature Rating: 2325°F/ 1270℃
Continuous Use Limit: 1835°F/ 1000℃

Exterior Surface:
Direct Contact Limit: 1810°F/ 989℃
Radiant Heat Limit: 2475°F/ 1378℃

So it seems the majority of the product components are quite heat resistant, taking temps higher than will melt some metals (engineeringtoolbox.com for melting point of metals), so some component, or maybe a byproduct of the manufacturing process itself, is off-gassing something that the retained heat from the turbo is hot enough to burn away.

Anyway, I didn't mean to derail this tutorial. But if you could let us know about that wired component from the early part of the installation, that would be helpful. Is it just a slot through the blanket that fits around that sensor? Thanks.

Steve.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Nice job on the tutorial, thanks.

1st message, photo 5, below the single bolt you ID to remove, there is some sort of sensor(?) with wires coming out of it. The next photo, #6, as you are setting the blanket, we see the sensor going through a hole in the blanket. Did that sensor need to be removed, then fit the blanket, and then reinstall the sensor? Or does the blanket somehow wrap around that sensor without having to remove it?

Secondly, you really had that little smoke? In the other biggie turbo blanket thread (sorry for not linking that thread, please edit to insert it if possible) reports of smoke from this exact blanket are wide ranging, from minor smoke to grave concern from smoke nearly billowing out of the engine bay. Has the mfr. or supplier given any more in-depth information as to what is leading to the smoking? I am not starting a debate, I sincerely want to know what it is that is burning off, and why more with some of their blankets and less smoke with other samples. I will be installing one from the beginning of my ownership but I want to be a fully informed consumer of honest information.

Thanks for you effort here, much appreciated.

Steve.
That's an oxygen sensor. You don't need to remove it, as there is a slot in the thermal blanket for it. If it had to be removed, I would have included that as part of the steps for the thermal blanket, as that requires an O2 sensor socket to remove.

Yes, I didn't have much smoke. Sure, you could smell it, but even with the engine bay open, you couldn't see more than a small stream of smoke coming out like what you'd get blowing out a candle or two. It wasn't billowing smoke or anything that anyone else would notice with the hood closed.

I'm wondering if someone maybe forgot to remove the little plastic protective cover on the SILA badge. I almost didn't realize it was there myself, since it doesn't cover the rivets of the badge, but I can't imagine it will hold up to much heat without burning.

I haven't heard anything from the manufacturer regarding the smoke. My best guess is that it's residual chemicals from the manufacturing process that are burning off.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
You can see the O2 sensor slot pretty well in the picture they have on the website of the thermal blanket.
 

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I'm wondering if someone maybe forgot to remove the little plastic protective cover on the SILA badge. I almost didn't realize it was there myself, since it doesn't cover the rivets of the badge, but I can't imagine it will hold up to much heat without burning.
My thought, exactly. It may be a small piece of film, but I imagine it could generate some noticeable smoke.
 

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Good, thanks guys for calming my nerves. I guess I should not worry about installing this one, esp. with no viable alternatives available at this time.

Steve.
 

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I'm holding out a bit for PTP to release a blanket, I like the materials they use.
 

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XtremeRevolution,

Thank You from everyone here at MADNESS Autoworks for the time and effort and detailed install. We truly appreciate it and have listed the install instructions though our product listing on our website to allow future customers to see the tools and required work to install this product. Awesome Job and Thank You once again!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Good, thanks guys for calming my nerves. I guess I should not worry about installing this one, esp. with no viable alternatives available at this time.

Steve.
Yeah, the 4th time I took the car out, I stopped smelling any hint of smoke at all. It's a sweet smell, almost likely a glycol burning (antifreeze, for example). It's not really that offensive of a smell, and it lessens each subsequent heat cycle you put it through.

This wasn't intended to be a review thread, but it's a quality product. It does what it claims to and reduces under-hood temperatures. I haven't had a chance to drive it long and hard enough to tell if there is a noticeable performance gain, but the science behind theoretical benefits is sound. The installation is simple and quick, and it's easy to revert back to stock if you need to take your car in for service.
 

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4. Remove the three 10mm bolts shown below. Use a 10mm wrench for the lower bolt. Once removed, you can lift the heat shield and set it aside.


5. Remove the 10mm bolt shown below.
Is the lower fastener a nut or a bolt? It looks like a nut on a stud, but in the next pic the stud is gone.

The weird bolt in pic 5, what is its purpose?
 

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Shark ...wild guess ...a lifting bolt used for turbo install???
That's probably a good guess. I hadn't considered that.
 

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I was able to use a small 1/4 drive ratchet and 10 mm deep socket for the lower nut with no trouble. At first I thought the stud was coming out with the nut, but it did not.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I was able to use a small 1/4 drive ratchet and 10 mm deep socket for the lower nut with no trouble. At first I thought the stud was coming out with the nut, but it did not.
Mine must have been stuck on the stud pretty well then. Honestly I thought it was all one piece; I didn't look hard enough to realize it was just a nut on a stud.
 

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The PTP blanket installs in a similar manner, but it comes with washers to use for the larger hole in the blanket. Also, the slot for the O2 sensor on the PTP appears to wrap around it more completely.
 
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