Fiat 124 Spider Forum banner
41 - 60 of 127 Posts

· Administrator
Joined
·
2,044 Posts
Discussion Starter · #41 · (Edited)
"It should be tucked between the turbo and the heat shield bracket" and you stand corrected...

I'm surprised JFernald didn't catch the #7 mistake...He is pretty good at that from looking at all the post I have been reading since I just joined this forum.

And I really appreciate your help and insight in helping all the members of this forum. Thanks Xtreme...
I thought you were talking about the bracket that goes over the top of the turbo. If you're talking about the bracket to the side of the turbo that the heat shield bolts onto, then no, it shouldn't be installed between the turbo and that bracket/heat shield for the same reasons as mentioned above.

To conclude, if the side bracket is the one you're referring to, then no, you can't fit the heat shield there because you'll interfere with the wastegate actuator.

When in doubt, just review the installation instructions.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
1,027 Posts
Unfortunately, you can't tuck the blanket between the bracket and the turbo. You will be left with nothing to bolt the blanket down to, and the blanket would be up against the moving parts of the wastegate.

An ideal blanket would be one that completely encapsulated the turbine housing, one that would require removal of the turbo. But, that's not what we are getting here.
Shark is right. Between the bracket and turbo will interfere with the waste gate mechanism. Between the bracket and the valve cover is the recommended method according to the vendor's instructions for the Sila blanket. This also provides a means of bolting up that side of the blanket as Shark pointed out, to the heat shield bracket.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
1,027 Posts
I thought you were talking about the bracket that goes over the top of the turbo. If you'er talking about the bracket to the side of the turbo that the heat shield bolts onto, then no, it shouldn't be installed between the turbo and that bracket/heat shield for the same reasons as mentioned above.

To conclude, if the side bracket is the one you're referring to, then no, you can't mount the turbo there because you'll interfere with the wastegate actuator.

When in doubt, just review the installation instructions.
As Xtreme suggests, always refer to the instructions when in doubt. You can refer to Xtreme's tutorial, or the instructions on the Madness website
 

· Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Xtreme,

Thank you for setting this straight. I worry about some of our members running off in the wrong direction based on misinformation.
This is the problem I find with most bulletin boards. There is so much misinformation, novices just end up getting so confused they just throw up their hands and move on. These opinions with no basis in fact, need to be filtered. Is there anyway the members posts could be vetted by the moderators before they appear on the board? I fear if something isn't done, this site will just become useless.
 

· Administrator
Joined
·
2,044 Posts
Discussion Starter · #45 ·
This is the problem I find with most bulletin boards. There is so much misinformation, novices just end up getting so confused they just throw up their hands and move on. These opinions with no basis in fact, need to be filtered. Is there anyway the members posts could be vetted by the moderators before they appear on the board? I fear if something isn't done, this site will just become useless.
I'll share some of the things I've been working on behind the scenes.

I was added on as a moderator on this forum because of my reputation from CruzeTalk.com. Over on CruzeTalk, I took over the Administrator role when all of the moderators had abandoned the forum. I nominated three moderators that were genuine gearheads. We set up a Gearhead badge for those who demonstrated exemplary technical knowledge of automotive mechanics and a general engineering mindset, and our own hidden section where technical issues could be discussed. Having participated in forums prior to that where misinformation was rampant, I was determined to prevent that from happening there. I was very successful, and our forum was regularly commended for how genuinely helpful and informative it was.

Once you identify and recognize subject matter experts, it becomes a bit easier for other members to weed through the misinformation. The problem is identifying subject matter experts when you're not one. I'm fortunate enough to have a wide array of technical knowledge and an engineering background, so I can generally smell BS from a mile away, but I have moments that I'm not proud of as well. Only a fool thinks he has nothing left to learn.

Online discussion boards, and the internet for that matter, has given everyone an equal voice. I like to say there is an overwhelming amount of information, but very little real wisdom. As many will discover, we may be equal in the eyes of God and the law, but we don't have equal levels of knowledge, equal experiences, or equal thought processes. Combine that with people that have hidden agendas, and the generally ignorant public has a difficult time weeding through the misinformation to determine what's really true. People often settle for perceived credibility, which doesn't always yield better results.

I know a lot about a lot of things and have some good insight due to my engineering background, but even if I had the free time, I wouldn't be in any position to review and approve posts to ensure their technical accuracy. I've found that the best approach is to create an atmosphere that admires and recognizes the contribution of technical knowledge, while being very confrontational and persistent when misinformation is presented. That's a responsibility that falls on the entire community, not just the moderators. Initiatives like the Gearhead badge we used on CruzeTalk were beneficial as we had a hidden section where we could come to an agreement on controversial technical topics and could guide the forum as a team toward technical accuracy. Perhaps we can start with something like that.

If you want this to be an informative and genuinely helpful community, you (and I refer to everyone here), need to do your part in contributing to discussions in an informative and helpful manner, appreciating, recognizing, and encouraging subject matter experts, and sparing no time in addressing any misinformation presented. I'll do my best to ensure the forum runs smoothly, but it's not just about the moderators; the forum is only as good as the community of members.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
224 Posts
Yes!!!,

i'll share some of the things i've been working on behind the scenes.

I was added on as a moderator on this forum because of my reputation from cruzetalk.com. Over on cruzetalk, i took over the administrator role when all of the moderators had abandoned the forum. I nominated three moderators that were genuine gearheads. We set up a gearhead badge for those who demonstrated exemplary technical knowledge of automotive mechanics and a general engineering mindset, and our own hidden section where technical issues could be discussed. Having participated in forums prior to that where misinformation was rampant, i was determined to prevent that from happening there. I was very successful, and our forum was regularly commended for how genuinely helpful and informative it was.

Once you identify and recognize subject matter experts, it becomes a bit easier for other members to weed through the misinformation. The problem is identifying subject matter experts when you're not one. I'm fortunate enough to have a wide array of technical knowledge and an engineering background, so i can generally smell bs from a mile away, but i have moments that i'm not proud of as well. Only a fool thinks he has nothing left to learn.

Online discussion boards, and the internet for that matter, has given everyone an equal voice. I like to say there is an overwhelming amount of information, but very little real wisdom. As many will discover, we may be equal in the eyes of god and the law, but we don't have equal levels of knowledge, equal experiences, or equal thought processes. Combine that with people that have hidden agendas, and the generally ignorant public has a difficult time weeding through the misinformation to determine what's really true. People often settle for perceived credibility, which doesn't always yield better results.

I know a lot about a lot of things and have some good insight due to my engineering background, but even if i had the free time, i wouldn't be in any position to review and approve posts to ensure their technical accuracy. I've found that the best approach is to create an atmosphere that admires and recognizes the contribution of technical knowledge, while being very confrontational and persistent when misinformation is presented. That's a responsibility that falls on the entire community, not just the moderators. Initiatives like the gearhead badge we used on cruzetalk were beneficial as we had a hidden section where we could come to an agreement on controversial technical topics and could guide the forum as a team toward technical accuracy. Perhaps we can start with something like that.

If you want this to be an informative and genuinely helpful community, you (and i refer to everyone here), need to do your part in contributing to discussions in an informative and helpful manner, appreciating, recognizing, and encouraging subject matter experts, and sparing no time in addressing any misinformation presented. I'll do my best to ensure the forum runs smoothly, but it's not just about the moderators; the forum is only as good as the community of members.
amen !!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
934 Posts
i would have to agree with you...Dude, did you ever get that fixed.

Not Sure.:x
Not Sure,

I know that you are Not Sure, but I am not sure what you are asking about. If you are talking about my catch can, I got that fixed a while back. I made a revised bracket that raised the can about 1/2 inch and I also discovered that the dealer had overfilled the oil. Once the oil level was normal, I had not issues with oil in the can or in the air filter.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3,580 Posts
So far I have a 1k km and the catch oil can is dry and oil level is to its maximum. Still not too much hot weather here, In 4 days, daylight time will start dipping, and summer has not settle yet, My Scatoletta is already counting days where she will be put asleep.:eek::crying:
 

· Registered
Joined
·
224 Posts
Good

Not Sure,

I know that you are Not Sure, but I am not sure what you are asking about. If you are talking about my catch can, I got that fixed a while back. I made a revised bracket that raised the can about 1/2 inch and I also discovered that the dealer had overfilled the oil. Once the oil level was normal, I had not issues with oil in the can or in the air filter.
Glad to read all is working correctly
 

· Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
I'll share some of the things I've been working on behind the scenes.

I was added on as a moderator on this forum because of my reputation from CruzeTalk.com. Over on CruzeTalk, I took over the Administrator role when all of the moderators had abandoned the forum. I nominated three moderators that were genuine gearheads. We set up a Gearhead badge for those who demonstrated exemplary technical knowledge of automotive mechanics and a general engineering mindset, and our own hidden section where technical issues could be discussed. Having participated in forums prior to that where misinformation was rampant, I was determined to prevent that from happening there. I was very successful, and our forum was regularly commended for how genuinely helpful and informative it was.

Once you identify and recognize subject matter experts, it becomes a bit easier for other members to weed through the misinformation. The problem is identifying subject matter experts when you're not one. I'm fortunate enough to have a wide array of technical knowledge and an engineering background, so I can generally smell BS from a mile away, but I have moments that I'm not proud of as well. Only a fool thinks he has nothing left to learn.

Online discussion boards, and the internet for that matter, has given everyone an equal voice. I like to say there is an overwhelming amount of information, but very little real wisdom. As many will discover, we may be equal in the eyes of God and the law, but we don't have equal levels of knowledge, equal experiences, or equal thought processes. Combine that with people that have hidden agendas, and the generally ignorant public has a difficult time weeding through the misinformation to determine what's really true. People often settle for perceived credibility, which doesn't always yield better results.

I know a lot about a lot of things and have some good insight due to my engineering background, but even if I had the free time, I wouldn't be in any position to review and approve posts to ensure their technical accuracy. I've found that the best approach is to create an atmosphere that admires and recognizes the contribution of technical knowledge, while being very confrontational and persistent when misinformation is presented. That's a responsibility that falls on the entire community, not just the moderators. Initiatives like the Gearhead badge we used on CruzeTalk were beneficial as we had a hidden section where we could come to an agreement on controversial technical topics and could guide the forum as a team toward technical accuracy. Perhaps we can start with something like that.

If you want this to be an informative and genuinely helpful community, you (and I refer to everyone here), need to do your part in contributing to discussions in an informative and helpful manner, appreciating, recognizing, and encouraging subject matter experts, and sparing no time in addressing any misinformation presented. I'll do my best to ensure the forum runs smoothly, but it's not just about the moderators; the forum is only as good as the community of members.
I certainly agree with much of this. From a high level it makes sense. The Gearhead badge is brilliant. I would extend the idea though and handle it the way enthusiasts magazines handle their "Service Section". The editor solicits and receives questions from the readers, and the Gearheads answer them. So posters are free to ask questions, but only the Gearheads are entitled to answer. This would solve your problem of screening posts because it is straight forward to determine that the post is a question or not without necessarily knowing anything about the subject of the question.
The problem is identifying the Gearheads. There are all kind of fake engineers who think they have something to add when they don't even have an engineering degree! I have worked for twenty years as an engineer, and have four patents related to the use of control agents acting like a "collective " to self heal control systems without the vulnerability of a central control processor, but like I tell my peers, "I was out the day they taught mechanical" so no, I don't know everything. Unfortunately it has never become the profession that it is in Europe where you can't do engineering work unless you have a degree. (Like the Professional Engineer certification that we have developed but only enforce on Civil Engineering disciplines.) Like you, or any of the Gearheads you might find, I can't know everything about everything, but the disciplined approach means the Gearheads can go out and consult with other professionals in the field to answer the ordinary board members questions.
I think a system like this is the only way to eliminate the misinformation. The idea that the posters are going to police all the other posters, I don't see working. That just ends up with people arguing back and forth with misrepresentations escalating to ad hominem attacks. The poor moderators end up being referees instead of consultants and board organizers.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3,580 Posts
I received the PTP turbo blanket, it came with 3 bolts and 3 washers. I was able to use only the 3 washers and 2 bolts. On #3 I was able to use only the washer cause only the nut came out. Only problem I had was removing nut -3 . Had to loosen and remove the stablelizing bar to remove the 3rd nut.

I followed the Sila blanket installation.

Anyway here is a picture of the blanket with the washers. I did not re-install the The EOM heat shield and make sure I did not drop any bolts and nuts.
 

Attachments

· Registered
Joined
·
219 Posts
I received the SILA turbo blanket, sans bolts that mount to the heat shield bracket; so far the only one I've been able to reuse is the nut/threaded stud on the turbo housing towards the bottom.

Hopefully the supplier will send the missing bits.
 
  • Like
Reactions: GregtheBike

· Registered
Joined
·
533 Posts
I received the SILA turbo blanket, sans bolts that mount to the heat shield bracket; so far the only one I've been able to reuse is the nut/threaded stud on the turbo housing towards the bottom.

Hopefully the supplier will send the missing bits.

mine came w/o bolts too
I just reused all the bolts I took off & it was fine
when I contacted them about it they said:

Wanted to email you back and let you know that the bolts supplied with the turbo blanket (as you now know) are not required for installation. We supply them for those DIY'ers that aren't all that skilled with installing aftermarket parts. What I mean is the bolts we supply are 5mm longer than the OEM bolts. This makes it easier to start the bolt after the blanket has been installed (added thickness of the blanket) but they are not required. If you need anything else please let me know. I'll get back to you ASAP.
so I just left it at that...
 

· Registered
Joined
·
219 Posts
Okay, I had some difficulty with reusing the topmost heat shield bolts, and left them off, such that the blanket is resting on top of the heat shield bracket.

I should make an effort to get those bolts mounted.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
219 Posts
I took off the heat shield. Still, I found the stock bolts too short to affix the blanket to the heat shield bracket up top.

Instead, I ordered a pair of M6-1.0x20mm hex flange bolts from this company.

Worked like a charm.
 

· Administrator
Joined
·
2,044 Posts
Discussion Starter · #57 ·
Just wanted to briefly report back on the SILA blanket.

The blanket definitely keeps under-hood temperatures lower, even by touching components in the engine bay after running. However, there is white residue on nearby engine bay components, a side-effect I think the manufacturer should have disclosed. I hear the PTP blanket doesn't have this problem, so I'll probably replace this at some point as it will get old having to wash the engine bay.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
840 Posts
Great Turtorial... Used it today to install PTP RED Blanket. A 15 min Job. I installed my heat shield over the blanket as direct turbo contact is ideal for the PTP. Figured the Shield over the blank promoted more contact/snugness. Thanks again for the useful DIY Guide.
 

Attachments

  • Like
Reactions: sharkcohen
41 - 60 of 127 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top