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I'm sure this must have been asked and answered, but as I can't find it, I shall pose the question: what is the impact on the ride of lowering a Euro Spec F124? I'm considering it for purely aesthetic reasons, but am very happy with the standard ride/handling and don't want to **** it up.

Thanks!
 

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I'm sure this must have been asked and answered, but as I can't find it, I shall pose the question: what is the impact on the ride of lowering a Euro Spec F124? I'm considering it for purely aesthetic reasons, but am very happy with the standard ride/handling and don't want to **** it up.

Thanks!
Ride quality will suffer, but the extent will depend entirely on how much you lower it and using what method. Coilovers and lowering springs will respond differently. Reducing ride height without improving the dampers will usually have a negative effect on ride quality. Expect the ride to be stiffer for sure.

As much as I want to lower my Abarth, I will probably keep it at stock ride height for at least a few years due to the quality of the roads here and my desire for having more suspension travel when driving in a spirited fashion over uneven roads over aesthetics.
 

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I've never been a fan of significantly dropped suspension, but I lowered my Classica about 20mm using Eibach springs with the stock dampers (note that the US-Spec Eibach ProKit springs are slightly milder than the Euro spec) in conjunction with a good alignment and steering caster angle adjustment.

The general ride quality has not been significantly changed at all - still feels comfortable cruising on varying pavement quality at low and high speed alike. You can feel some increased firmness, but not to any sort of point of discomfort or regret.

What I have noticed is that the car is significantly more fun to drive. When I first purchased the Classica, I was a bit let down by the handling. IN MY OPINION (I've found some people are quite sensitive about this topic) it wallowed a bit in corners and felt soft at higher speeds, and the steering in general felt overboosted and vague. Following the subtle drop and the alignment work, the car feels like a scalpel. Sharp, predictable, planted... exactly what I hoped it would be.

Looks great, too. :)

 

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Once you don't get yourself into a situation like this... you should be alright ;) a little drop and slight stiffening up could make the steering response and directness a noticeable amount better and a bit more planted. Add some quality tires and you'll be real happy.


 

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I have only positive experiences to say about my Progress springs. Sure, ride quality is slightly harsher than before, but the difference is incremental at best, whereas the difference in handling is more of a step change in terms of improvement. To be fair, I did upgrade to Abarth/Club Bilsteins as well. But given that I'm running the stock rear sway bar (which is stiffer than the Abarth's), the car corners much more flat than before, and handles sharp transitions with ease. It also looks much better (in my opinion) :
 

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My only concern with lowering springs is that it doesn't solve the problem that caused the vehicle to be floaty and soft in the first place; the dampers. Springs exist primarily to support the weight of the vehicle for a given suspension travel. Lowered springs often have progressive rates that get stiffer as they compress, which allows the vehicle to remain comfortable over normal roads but keeps the suspension from crashing through on larger bumps with a shortened suspension travel.

Now, if you lower your car on factory classica/lusso dampers, you end up with less suspension travel, but without the damping ability to effectively control the rate of suspension travel over more harsh uneven roads. The car feels more planted as a result of the reduced body sway, but hit a decent sized bump while aggressively cornering and you'll be more likely to upset the chassis.

In my opinion, any lowering springs should be accompanied by improved dampers, which will undoubtedly make the car feel stiffer.

Just my thoughts on the subject.
 

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The Abarth Bilsteins are overdamped on the stock springs. It works better with stiffer springs.
I have that impression as well, but with the kind of roads we have here in the midwest, I don't mind the extra travel.

I do believe that as a result, the Abarth will respond well to lowered springs.
 

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But which ones?

I have that impression as well, but I with the kind of roads we have here in the midwest, I don't mind the extra travel.

I do believe that as a result, the Abarth will respond well to lowered springs.
There are quite a number of choices. I'd feel challenged to pick the right ones. I wouldn't even know where to begin.:|
Best regards
Pete
 

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There are quite a number of choices. I'd feel challenged to pick the right ones. I wouldn't even know where to begin.:|
Best regards
Pete
In that boat right now. Not sure which way to go.
 

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Impact of lowering? Difficulty cleaning the wheel wells! Trying to find a jack which will fit under and reach the front subframe crossmember!

I chose the progress springs because they are what I would call proportionally stiffer than the OEM, and match up with the blisteins (based on research into string rates). It also lowers the car about an inch and a bit. They are a decent price, too, so if you don't like them you haven't lost a lot. I should have changed the bump stops in the shocks at the same time, but with just street driving at the moment, there has been no detrimental affects. The ride is marginally harder (stiffer) but corners feel more 'confident'. I also added sway bars, too.

It's not too hard to do it yourself - no gotchas - with a few basic mechanics tools, a torque wrench and spring compressors (both from harbor freight will do the job), and a place to work.
 

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I second what was said above.
I got the Progress springs from Goodwin Racing on my Abarth. The amount of lowering is just perfect for what I was looking for. In order to keep suspension travel, I cut about 1/2 of an inch off of each stock bump stock.
As stated, the installation is fairly straightforward if you have a good floorjack, jack stands, and spring compressors. Make sure that you ( or your installer) follow the instructions for preloading the springs before you tighten down the control arms. And follow it up with a good custom alignment. The install of the springs will change your alignment and the factory alignment is all over the map to begin with.
Just finished a 4500 mile road trip with my wife and an overflowing trunk with the progress springs and a custom alignment. The car tracked perfectly straight on the interstates, was precise in the twisties, and predictable.

BUT, as others have stated, I am not sure how upgraded springs would work on the base classic/lusso dampers.
 
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