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I've gotten some messages asking for more information about the buyback under the CA lemon law. I'm not knowledgeable about the process in different states, but the CA law is very biased toward the consumer. Basically (simplest case), if your car spends at least 30 days in the shop within the first 18 months or 18,000 miles, it's very likely that you have a decent case against the manufacturer.
The lawyers in the south bay really will only take your case if it's almost guaranteed a win. The great part is that all the lawyers I talked to that deal with this don't bill you, as they send their bills to Chrysler (or whatever manufacturer). I believe that their fees come out of a separate pot of money from the manufacturer.
Anyhow, if your car matches any of the lemon law requirements, it seems that lawyers will gladly take them to court for you. For my situation, I had a black Abarth A/T that spend months in the shop (brakes, shifting issues, and the fun thermostat wait). As soon as my car sat at the dealership for day #31, I called the lawyer. As it was within the requirement list, I was informed it's a slam dunk for them.
The amount of work you have to do on your end is send them a copy (email/fax) of your purchase agreement, the rental car receipts (if the dealer gave you one), a bank statement if paying off a loan, registration, and drivers license. Once they get that, they pretty much do their thing. It took roughly 2 months before I heard back from them.
The lawyers called me and said the judgement was in my favor and I was offered two options. The first was to keep the car and sign a document saying I would not declare it a lemon again. If that option was chosen, I'd get $8000 for my troubles. The other option is to have it declared a lemon and they'd (FCA) would purchase it back for a fair price. I wasn't too keen on signing a document limiting my future rights, so I went with the buyback.
After about 2 or 3 weeks, my lawyer informed me that they'd buy the car back for full retail price plus the taxes and registration. In addition, I got ~5k extra. The lawyers got $7k, which was separate from my pot. Win-Win. The process for returning was that Chrysler would make an appointment within a month to pick up the car.
A Chrysler rep emailed and called me saying they'd pick it up at the closest Fiat dealer service shop, before it opened. I just had to make sure there weren't any damages beyond normal wear and tear to the car. My car had 3500 miles after 9 months, so I didn't get a chance to mess anything up. Upon arriving, it takes roughly 30 minutes for the process to complete. They check the outside, tires, etc... and then print out the paperwork. The rep was in a hurry, as he had a few other appointments after.
The car carrier had a white abarth, 2 lussos, and an odd classica (exhaust weirdness). The plates on the carrier were New Jersey, so it's possible you may see a used abarth in jersey soon (not quite sure what happens to lemon vehicles). That's it, not much needed on the consumer's part, just some waiting. The CA lemon law is really nice and super easy to deal with. If you're in Los Angeles, there are numerous firms that deal only with this.

PS I left my NAV card in the car when I surrendered it, so if you see a used Abarth, check the nav slot...
 

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Thanks for the information. I've been curious about how the system works. Fortunately, my Abarth has been flawless at 6,000 miles and I've heard great reports from others with 2-3 times that mileage. It's such a great car. Are you going to skip town or purchase another Abarth?

Regarding the resale of your old ride, I've heard some nefarious things about Carmax.
 
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