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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Thanks to Bulldog66 for putting much of this list together. I wanted to get a thread going where the primary post can be updated to include new specs or new lowered spring options.

The Abarth 124 Spider has Bilstein shocks that are considered by some to be over-dampened, which would suggest they would work well with many lowering spring options. A further discussion on this particular topic can be found here: http://www.124spider.org/forum/153-brakes-suspension/18714-stock-abarth-bilstein-gwr-roadster-sport-springs.html

Notes:
- I don't recommend lowering on the OE non-Abarth shocks.
- The name of each spring now includes a link where each can be ordered.
- I have removed spring rates from these listings. The reason is that there is no standard for quoting spring rates, and there is no reference to spring function or spring rate ramping. More details in this link: http://blog.perrinperformance.com/spring-rate-101-by-hr-springs/ . Be careful when comparing springs based on spring rate alone, as you won't get a clear picture of how that spring will perform or feel.


Currently available lowering springs:
Roadster Sport (GWR)
Front Lowering: -.75 - -1 Inch
Rear Lowering: -.75 - -1 Inch

Progress Technology
Front Lowering: -1 - -1.5 Inch
Rear Lowering: -1 - -1.5 Inch

H&R
Front Lowering: -1.2 Inch
Rear Lowering: -1.1 Inch

Eibach Pro
Front Lowering: -1.4 Inch
Rear Lowering: -1.3 Inch

Swift Spec-R
Front Lowering: -1.4 Inch
Rear Lowering: -1.3 Inch

Flying Miata
Front Lowering: -1.5 Inch
Rear Lowering: -1.5 Inch

Whiteline
Front Lowering: -1.18 Inch
Rear Lowering: -1.18 Inch

Tanabe GF210
Front Lowering: -1.5 Inch
Rear Lowering: -1.3 Inch
 

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I'll chime in regarding the lack of published spring rates for H&R. I have talked to them about this. They say they don't publish spring rates because comparing two different brands by that number isn't really valid. Different brands use different methods for testing rendering direct comparisons invalid. It's somewhat analogous to comparing "treadwear" ratings from different tire brands. In regards to springs, some are tested with a certain load on them, some a different load and some with no load.

We sell most of these brands on our site. I personally run H&R springs. I feel they are the best for a serious street, but light track duty car. They also work just fine with the standard shocks, or the Bilstein shocks. I have asked H&R about this specifically, and they verified that they measure the standard shocks to make sure that they are not using a spring that's too much for it.

Greg

P.S. for what it's worth, it's actually possible to call H&R. They answer the phone! It's not a phone maze of buttons to push, a real person who actually knows stuff answers the phone. I am so happy about that. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I'll chime in regarding the lack of published spring rates for H&R. I have talked to them about this. They say they don't publish spring rates because comparing two different brands by that number isn't really valid. Different brands use different methods for testing rendering direct comparisons invalid. It's somewhat analogous to comparing "treadwear" ratings from different tire brands. In regards to springs, some are tested with a certain load on them, some a different load and some with no load.

We sell most of these brands on our site. I personally run H&R springs. I feel they are the best for a serious street, but light track duty car. They also work just fine with the standard shocks, or the Bilstein shocks. I have asked H&R about this specifically, and they verified that they measure the standard shocks to make sure that they are not using a spring that's too much for it.

Greg

P.S. for what it's worth, it's actually possible to call H&R. They answer the phone! It's not a phone maze of buttons to push, a real person who actually knows stuff answers the phone. I am so happy about that. :)
Thanks for that explanation. I've been strongly considering lowering springs for the Abarth but definitely didn't want spring rates that were too stiff. When I hear someone say they will be "okay" on Bilsteins but ideally should use Konis, I start to think they might be too stiff for me. Sounds like H&R would be the ticket. I didn't want to lower the car because of the roads we have here, but I just can't get over how good this car looks when lowered. I mean, every car looks better lowered, but the 124 Spider looks like it was meant to be that way.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Xtreme

Also and interesting read for springs on the Abarth

https://www.flyinmiata.com/nd-flyin-miata-springs.html
I linked to that page in the initial post. The spring rate is very similar to that of the GWR springs, and so is the wording in the description:

We have tested them with the stock Club Bilsteins and found it acceptable for both performance and ride - surprisingly good for ride. Those shocks are overdamped to begin with, so we're simply giving them the springs they desire! They work even better with the Koni Sport...
It makes me wonder, if they work better with the Koni Sport, if it's the equivalent of running 87 octane in this engine instead of 91/93. "It will run, but it will run better on 91/93."

I'm a bit hesitant given how much stiffer those springs are compared to everything else on the list. The wording from both sites suggests to me that they are ideally suited to be used with the Koni Sport shocks, and that they are simply "okay," or "acceptable," with the Bilsteins.
 

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Note that the US and Euro versions of the Eibach Prokit springs are different.

Their German website shows an expected drop of 1.35" front and 1" rear on the Euro ProKit springs. With the US-spec springs, my Classica yielded a more mild 1" drop front and .75" drop rear compared to stock.

(there is also the Eibach Sportline version with an even more aggressive ~2" drop)
 

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I linked to that page in the initial post. The spring rate is very similar to that of the GWR springs, and so is the wording in the description:



It makes me wonder, if they work better with the Koni Sport, if it's the equivalent of running 87 octane in this engine instead of 91/93. "It will run, but it will run better on 91/93."

I'm a bit hesitant given how much stiffer those springs are compared to everything else on the list. The wording from both sites suggests to me that they are ideally suited to be used with the Koni Sport shocks, and that they are simply "okay," or "acceptable," with the Bilsteins.

I did call GWR and asked about which springs they would recommend for an Abarth for performance street. There was zero hesitation, the Roadster Sport springs hands down. He had no concerns.

So it might be some marketing/sales going on as well. Selling Koni shocks as well certainly bumps up the price and profit. Don't know..just speculating.
 

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What rates are folks paying to get a set (of four) lowering springs installed, at reputable shops, not including alignment? Trying to get an idea what the total cost is, as springs themselves seem fairly reasonable ($200+).

Thx, S
 

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What rates are folks paying to get a set (of four) lowering springs installed, at reputable shops, not including alignment? Trying to get an idea what the total cost is, as springs themselves seem fairly reasonable ($200+).

Thx, S
I have been quoted around $550 with a full 4 wheel laser alignment. 4 hours for the springs.
 

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Looking between the GWR and the Flying Miata (FM), the FM looks to be more progressive. ??
 

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Discussion Starter #12
May I ask what this recommendation is based on? I own a Lusso that I am considering lowering (Eibach or Progressive).

TIA, S.
It is a personal note based on the ability of the OE dampers. If you do lower, I would recommend getting the most conservative springs on that list.
 

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Calling Flying Miata tomorrow
 

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JC Automotive

What rates are folks paying to get a set (of four) lowering springs installed, at reputable shops, not including alignment? Trying to get an idea what the total cost is, as springs themselves seem fairly reasonable ($200+).

Thx, S
Hello!
Don't know if you're familiar with these guys. I used them for 15 years with my Miata and they're great. In Round Rock . . . they know how to align too.
Best regards
Pete
 

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I’ve got the Eibach springs & sway bars on my Lusso and it did transform the handling of the car. There’s Much less roll & pitching, but it’s still a comfortable ride. The car is lowered less than an inch but does look considerably better as a bonus. Haven’t had any trouble with driveways or drainage dips, etc. so I’m pretty happy with the compromise.

But...(Lol) I’m used to it now and although it’s much much better, I still get more opposite rear squatting (when exiting a turn under power ) than I’d like. The tires do maintain good contact when going over bumps in a turn so I hesitate to stiffen it much. My little truck skates badly over stuff like that and it’s disconcerting to say the least!

What changes would I expect to get by changing the factory dampers to the Koni sport ? And are those generally thought to go well with a setup like mine? Or is this purely a function of spring rates?

I know this was an Abarth thread but appreciate any advice or links
 

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I chose the autoexe springs -20mm because the eibach in europe too low the machine -35mm and it seems aesthetically ugly, the wheel flush fender from a feeling not very dynamic, it looks like a crushed car. the springs -20 allow you to have more space between the wheel and the fender, moreover they compress less the original blistein .... they should work better
 

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It is a personal note based on the ability of the OE dampers. If you do lower, I would recommend getting the most conservative springs on that list.
Even with the Abarth Bilstein shocks lowering springs are a compromise because you are riding in the lower bump area of the shock which leads to blown shocks. The Lusso/Classica shocks will probably have the same or better life expectancy as the bilsteins because they arent valved as aggressivly. If you are concerned with shock longevity spend a little more on a proper coilover setup that offers a far superior ride and handling.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Even with the Abarth Bilstein shocks lowering springs are a compromise because you are riding in the lower bump area of the shock which leads to blown shocks. The Lusso/Classica shocks will probably have the same or better life expectancy as the bilsteins because they arent valved as aggressivly. If you are concerned with shock longevity spend a little more on a proper coilover setup that offers a far superior ride and handling.
Have we actually seen any blown shocks on these cars from lowered springs? I understand the principle theoretically but haven't actually seen it happen.
 

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To Better answer the question, your stock shocks typically won't blow out, but they will wear out noticeably faster than on stock springs. For many people this effect is gradual enough that they won't notice, or they sell their cars before it becomes really bad. However, if you are running 30K miles + on Eibach springs, the handling and ride quality definitely won't be as good as when your car was relatively new.

But, since most people don't really track their cars or drive aggressively, it's not that big of a deal. Springs are great for looks and cost savings.

If you really want to make your car handle and look good, get a set of good coilovers. Do it once and do it right. If you can't afford to do it right, save more money.
 
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