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Discussion Starter #21
To Better answer the question, your stock shocks typically won't blow out, but they will wear out noticeably faster than on stock springs. For many people this effect is gradual enough that they won't notice, or they sell their cars before it becomes really bad. However, if you are running 30K miles + on Eibach springs, the handling and ride quality definitely won't be as good as when your car was relatively new.

But, since most people don't really track their cars or drive aggressively, it's not that big of a deal. Springs are great for looks and cost savings.

If you really want to make your car handle and look good, get a set of good coilovers. Do it once and do it right. If you can't afford to do it right, save more money.
I mean I'll give you an example. I just installed GWR's springs, which are a bit stiffer and lower the car 1/2-3/4 an inch on Bilsteins.

If I weighed 50 pounds more and always had a passenger with me and some luggage in the trunk, I might end up with a comparable drop in ride height, or at least I'd come close. When discussing theoretical effects, I like to ask, "just how much of a difference will it actually make?"

Bilstein B6s are some pretty well built shocks. I don't know what their "effective range" is supposed to be or how they'll handle stiffer springs in the long term.
 

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I mean I'll give you an example. I just installed GWR's springs, which are a bit stiffer and lower the car 1/2-3/4 an inch on Bilsteins.

If I weighed 50 pounds more and always had a passenger with me and some luggage in the trunk, I might end up with a comparable drop in ride height, or at least I'd come close. When discussing theoretical effects, I like to ask, "just how much of a difference will it actually make?"

Bilstein B6s are some pretty well built shocks. I don't know what their "effective range" is supposed to be or how they'll handle stiffer springs in the long term.
Its not just that the springs are stiffer its the fact that they are shorter too and dont have the preload on them that the factory and shock company setup. example if your suspension drops out over a pot hole or irregular surface the stock spring is in tension still so when the shock recovers it has the some compression resistance so the shock valving isn't rapidly making full stroke. Now make that spring 1" shorter with little to no preload phis is what causes premature wear on the shock and it is noted on multiple forums not just here on the 124 which is still a relatively new platform.

Also take your example for instance "If I weighed 50 pounds more and always had a passenger with me and some luggage in the trunk, I might end up with a comparable drop in ride height, or at least I'd come close."
You just lowered you car and have the same situation your car is now lowered 2.0"-2.25" effectively at the bottom or bottomed out the stroke.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Its not just that the springs are stiffer its the fact that they are shorter too and dont have the preload on them that the factory and shock company setup. example if your suspension drops out over a pot hole or irregular surface the stock spring is in tension still so when the shock recovers it has the some compression resistance so the shock valving isn't rapidly making full stroke. Now make that spring 1" shorter with little to no preload phis is what causes premature wear on the shock and it is noted on multiple forums not just here on the 124 which is still a relatively new platform.

Also take your example for instance "If I weighed 50 pounds more and always had a passenger with me and some luggage in the trunk, I might end up with a comparable drop in ride height, or at least I'd come close."
You just lowered you car and have the same situation your car is now lowered 2.0"-2.25" effectively at the bottom or bottomed out the stroke.
Regarding the discussion on preload, I don't think this is the case. There is still preload on the shock, the spring is just shorter. Spring length as pretty similar on both springs I used (the rears being a tad shorter, but not by much) so I don't think this would be an issue. Now I'm not presuming to be an expert on this, just continuing discussion. Both the struts and rear struts still have preload on the shock when fully extended. I posted pictures showing that in my own tutorial for the spring/shock change. Now, I can only speak for the springs I used. Can't really say much for any others.

As for my example, that's not exactly true, because in my case, I did lower my car, but my spring rate is now higher as well, so it takes more weight to compress the spring for a given unit of measurement. This is why some note that their car is significantly "flatter" in the corners, since it takes more weight from the car leaning to compress that side of the car.
 

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Regarding the discussion on preload, I don't think this is the case. There is still preload on the shock, the spring is just shorter. Spring length as pretty similar on both springs I used (the rears being a tad shorter, but not by much) so I don't think this would be an issue. Now I'm not presuming to be an expert on this, just continuing discussion. Both the struts and rear struts still have preload on the shock when fully extended. I posted pictures showing that in my own tutorial for the spring/shock change. Now, I can only speak for the springs I used. Can't really say much for any others.

As for my example, that's not exactly true, because in my case, I did lower my car, but my spring rate is now higher as well, so it takes more weight to compress the spring for a given unit of measurement. This is why some note that their car is significantly "flatter" in the corners, since it takes more weight from the car leaning to compress that side of the car.
The GWR Roadstersport springs are the most conservative as far as lowering goes and are probably the highest spring rates available. Because of this your setup will both handle the best and last the longest for just a spring upgrade.
But if you went with the Progressive springs the rates only increase 23Lbs/In front and 18Lbs/In rear and lower the car .25-.75 more than the Roadstersport springs which could easily lead to premature wear.

Like i said previously since most people don't really track their cars or drive aggressively, it's not that big of a deal. Springs are great for looks and cost savings. The springs you went with would be the best option before going to an adjustable coilover setup.

The following was pulled from another thread and i thought it would be useful here.
MX5 (Non-Club)

Spring Rates
Front Rear

F156 R80

124
F160 R85

Abarth
F162 R97

Roadster Sport (GWR)
F300 R200

Progressive
F185 R115

H&R
F ? R ?

Eibach Pro
F188 R103

Credit @Bulldog66
 

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Discussion Starter #25
The GWR Roadstersport springs are the most conservative as far as lowering goes and are probably the highest spring rates available. Because of this your setup will both handle the best and last the longest for just a spring upgrade.
But if you went with the Progressive springs the rates only increase 23Lbs/In front and 18Lbs/In rear and lower the car .25-.75 more than the Roadstersport springs which could easily lead to premature wear.

Like i said previously since most people don't really track their cars or drive aggressively, it's not that big of a deal. Springs are great for looks and cost savings. The springs you went with would be the best option before going to an adjustable coilover setup.

The following was pulled from another thread and i thought it would be useful here.
MX5 (Non-Club)

Spring Rates
Front Rear

F156 R80

124
F160 R85

Abarth
F162 R97

Roadster Sport (GWR)
F300 R200

Progressive
F185 R115

H&R
F ? R ?

Eibach Pro
F188 R103

Credit @Bulldog66
I see what you're saying. Yeah the drop is not huge and the spring rate is significantly higher. So you're saying it's not so much the spring rate that affects the shock wear but rather the range of operation, if I'm understanding this correctly.

Honestly I don't think I'd go with coilovers. I could just buy Koni adjustable shocks and have another 1" of drop on these springs according to GWR, and I wouldn't want to be any lower than that with the kind of roads we have around here.

Thanks for sharing!
 

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I went with the Progress springs - a slightly higher rate and a drop for a street car. The GWR springs seemed a bit stiff for me (at the time) but it sounds like people with those springs are happy with them for a street car.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
I went with the Progress springs - a slightly higher rate and a drop for a street car. The GWR springs seemed a bit stiff for me (at the time) but it sounds like people with those springs are happy with them for a street car.
To be honest most of the time I don't even notice that I'm running lowered springs. At normal tilt, over moderate bumps, it feels the same. The only time it feels stiffer is when I'm going over larger bumps, like railroad tracks, and even then it's tolerable. I expected them to be harsh, but was surprised to find that they felt very similar.

I still don't think the stock sway bars are stiff enough though.
 

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After buying a set of H&R 30/30 springs for my 2018 Abarth spider 5,000 km on clock (I am a Mechanic and have access to 3d wheel aligner and work on F3 open wheelers )
Before fitting ride height and wheel alignment specs where.
Front ride height 365mm
Rear ride height 363 mm
Front toe 1.5mm
FL camber +0.05 deg
FR camber -0.21 deg
L caster +8.21 deg
R caster+7.82 deg
Rear toe 3.2mm
RL camber -1.00 deg
RR camber -0.56 deg

Not what you would expect from factory I checked three times and came up with consistent results, however car had good balance and steered straight.

After putting in H&R 30/30 lowering springs set wheel alignment to
-0.40 camber all round
2mm toe in front and rear
and +9.0 caster front
ride heights after fitting springs
Front 320 mm (45mm drop)
Rear 338 mm (25mm drop)
Test drove car way to stiff with chronic oversteer (due to extreme rake and excessive spring rate) very disappointing.
So I removed the springs did some measurements and ascertained that lowering the front spring platform by 10 mm would drop the front by 15mm and lowering rear spring platform by 15 mm would lower the rear by 15mm
I machined new grooves on the shocks refitted and set wheel alignment to
-0.4camber
2mm toe all round
front ride height 350 mm
rear ride height 348 mm
handling returned and so did ride and balance,achieved the look and improved handling maintained comfort .
so for street don't buy the springs re machine the circlip groove for the spring platform.
front ratio is 1:1.5
rear ratio is 1:1
Although I wouldn't go more than 20mm on stock spring rates.
attached a stock ride height and lowered 15mm photo (didn't get a shot with H&R springs in)
 

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Its not just that the springs are stiffer its the fact that they are shorter too and dont have the preload on them that the factory and shock company setup. example if your suspension drops out over a pot hole or irregular surface the stock spring is in tension still so when the shock recovers it has the some compression resistance so the shock valving isn't rapidly making full stroke. Now make that spring 1" shorter with little to no preload phis is what causes premature wear on the shock and it is noted on multiple forums not just here on the 124 which is still a relatively new platform.

Also take your example for instance "If I weighed 50 pounds more and always had a passenger with me and some luggage in the trunk, I might end up with a comparable drop in ride height, or at least I'd come close."
You just lowered you car and have the same situation your car is now lowered 2.0"-2.25" effectively at the bottom or bottomed out the stroke.
Sorry, old thread, but doesn't the Bilstein B8 take care of this problem?
 

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Hi guys, I want buy lowered springs for my Abarth 124, I'm trying to understand if it's better a solution with Eibach Pro-Kit or Eibach Sportline, is there anyone that has Sportiline installed that can show me a picture?

Thanks!
Luca
 
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