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In this video, we show you how to change the oil on a Fiat 124 Spider Abarth. This applies to all Fiat 124 Spider Models including Classica, Lusso and Abarth.

We use 4 quarts of Castrol Edge Full Synthetic 5W40 Engine Oil and a WIX Oil Filter.

Tools Needed:

13mm wrench
3/8” Socket Wrench
(2) 3/8” Socket Extension
10mm Socket
12mm Socket
8mm or 7mm Socket (depending on type of intake on the vehicle)
27mm Socket
Funnel
Pic or Thin Flathead Screwdriver
Small Electric Impact

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Great video, and I do my own topside oil and filter changes, so after watching the video I had a couple of questions I wanted to toss by you. There's always new things to learn, and just because I do things one way doesn't mean there's not a better or easier way to do it than the way I'm currently approaching it. :)

First, I was wondering why you chose to completely remove the air intake to change the oil filter; or are you using that as an opportunity to clean the air filter at the same time as you're doing your oil and filter change? I'm able to do it just by removing the 10mm bolt that you discuss in the first step of the process, and after releasing the clamp that hold the intake to the turbo, to push the assembly off to the left to access the oil filter. Granted, with the intake completely removed, there's a lot more room to reach around in there to access the oil filter.

When you put the oil filter billet cap back on, I do the same hand tightening for the first part, but then I use a torque wrench to take it to 18 ft.lbs. If you just tighten till you can't move it anymore, would that risk breaking the billet cap, or am I being too cautious in my approach? I have a history of over-tightening things and breaking them, hence why I ask the question. It's also why I purchased an aluminum billet cap to replace the plastic one (to be installed during part of my spring oil change).

I'd love to see a video of a top side oil change so I could compare what I'm doing with what a pro does. My biggest question in that regard is how many inches it is from the top of the dipstick tube to the bottom of the oil pan. I think I'm getting all the used oil out, but I'm concerned that perhaps the tube I use to insert into the dipstick opening is perhaps bending at the bottom of the pan and not clearing the oil as well as it should.

Once again, great video, and I appreciate any feedback you can provide regarding my questions.
 
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Great video, and I do my own topside oil and filter changes, so after watching the video I had a couple of questions I wanted to toss by you. There's always new things to learn, and just because I do things one way doesn't mean there's not a better or easier way to do it than the way I'm currently approaching it. :)

First, I was wondering why you chose to completely remove the air intake to change the oil filter; or are you using that as an opportunity to clean the air filter at the same time as you're doing your oil and filter change? I'm able to do it just by removing the 10mm bolt that you discuss in the first step of the process, and after releasing the clamp that hold the intake to the turbo, to push the assembly off to the left to access the oil filter. Granted, with the intake completely removed, there's a lot more room to reach around in there to access the oil filter.

When you put the oil filter billet cap back on, I do the same hand tightening for the first part, but then I use a torque wrench to take it to 18 ft.lbs. If you just tighten till you can't move it anymore, would that risk breaking the billet cap, or am I being too cautious in my approach? I have a history of over-tightening things and breaking them, hence why I ask the question. It's also why I purchased an aluminum billet cap to replace the plastic one (to be installed during part of my spring oil change).

I'd love to see a video of a top side oil change so I could compare what I'm doing with what a pro does. My biggest question in that regard is how many inches it is from the top of the dipstick tube to the bottom of the oil pan. I think I'm getting all the used oil out, but I'm concerned that perhaps the tube I use to insert into the dipstick opening is perhaps bending at the bottom of the pan and not clearing the oil as well as it should.

Once again, great video, and I appreciate any feedback you can provide regarding my questions.
Thanks for watching! So to answer a few of your questions:

1. tightening the oil filter - I make sure it is tight. No I don’t use a torque wrench but 25 nm is nothing so I simply tighten it until it won’t turn anymore (with a little force). I have never had an issue of leaks or it coming loose. If you have upgrades to the billet oil cap, that’s even better so you don’t risk breaking it.

2. Removing the intake -because of how easy it is to remove, I do it to give me a lot more space to get oil filter out. Especially if you have a GFB, it becomes even more of a challenge (in my opinion). If you have a stock intake or even a V4, you can simply just remove that first section to gain access.

3. Top side oil change - I have done this several times with a Mityvac and it works great. I actually prefer it but we did the video this way because not everyone has that tool or wants to use it.

Let me know if you have any other questions and again, thank you for the support!
 

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I did my own topside oil change and didn't have to remove anything, except the DV+ connector which got in the way while installing the filter (not removing it though) Mind you I do have smaller hands which helps a bit. If you don't have the DV+ there's a chance you won't need to disconnect it, but don't know that for sure.

I was also concerned about removing all the oil but as the same amount went in as came out I figured it was all ok. One big benefit of doing it topside is that you can do it easily more often (if you're so inclined). Any residual oil will be diluted enough not to worry about. I'm not sure that anybody would know if the bottom drain gets more oil out anyway, you'd have to be super keen to find out by dropping the sump cover, if that's at all possible in situ.

The other advantage is that the oil goes straight into a bottle and disposed of at your recycling centre. No drain into pans and clean up, no transferring, no spillage, no putting car up on ramps, no crawling underneath, minimal tools. More efficient overall and only a couple of hours, mostly waiting for the vacuum to do its job.
 

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(Regarding topside oil removal...) My biggest question in that regard is how many inches it is from the top of the dipstick tube to the bottom of the oil pan. I think I'm getting all the used oil out, but I'm concerned that perhaps the tube I use to insert into the dipstick opening is perhaps bending at the bottom of the pan and not clearing the oil as well as it should.
I don't have a video of the procedure, but I've got explanation and photos about the extraction tube into the pan in my thread here. Look through it, it may answer your concerns.
hand pump, or other, to suck out motor oil

Steve.
 

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I haven’t changed the oil on my Abarth yet (this weekend I’ll be doing it) but I purchased an oil vac and did topside oil changes on both my wife’s Mazda CX-5 and my Nissan pickup. It seemed to get all the oil out, but I wanted to remove the drain plug on both vehicles to see if there was any residual oil. Guess what? I didn’t see a single drop of oil left in either vehicle. Using an oil vac (with an air compressor) is easy, less messy, and appears to remove more oil than just draining. The key I found is to wiggle the tube a bit until you see no more oil being sucked out.
 

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I like draining from the bottom. It gives me a chance to inspect things down there.
 

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I did a top side oil change on my abarth but I still needed to remove the drain plug so I could install my Dimple Magnetic drain plug. After sucking out the oil I removed the plug and no oil came out from the bottom. I will still do the top side oil change but I will also be removing the plug so I can clean off the magnet.
 

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I did a top side oil change on my abarth but I still needed to remove the drain plug so I could install my Dimple Magnetic drain plug. After sucking out the oil I removed the plug and no oil came out from the bottom. I will still do the top side oil change but I will also be removing the plug so I can clean off the magnet.
Seems like you are doing twice the work ?
 
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