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Discussion Starter #1
Give your FIAT 124 a more aggressive stance and look and improve the handling with these Wheel Spacers by Athena!

These spacers are designed to improve both your car's appearance and performance. These spacers allow your wheels to sit more flush with the fender and allows the wheels to fit perfectly in the wheel wells. When you extend the wheels out from the hubs you also improve your car's overall handling.







For additional information please visit:

http://shop.500madness.com/fiat-124-cid528/wheels-and-tires-cid539/fiat-124-wheel-spacers-by-athena-20mm-pid3378
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Really? What do these weigh each?
Weight will vary depending on which millimeter you want. The Athena Wheel Spacers are a high quality spacer made out of Billet Steel so weight will be very similar but if you have a specific millimeter weight you want please let me know.

how about a before and after pic of the tires and stance?
I will upload some photos for you tomorrow to show the difference of before and after. We have the 124 ABARTH here at our Spicewood, Texas location with these spacers as well so I will see what I can do for you to get some pictures to compare.
 

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The problem is , the studs are not mounted in the spacers. So it's a PITA to mount these. I wish there was a simple wheel adapter like the ones I used from H&R on my Porsche.
 

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Weight will vary depending on which millimeter you want. The Athena Wheel Spacers are a high quality spacer made out of Billet Steel so weight will be very similar but if you have a specific millimeter weight you want please let me know.
A bit academic as fitting spacers is illegal in Australia. But I kinda figured that 20mm spacers made out of billet steel can't be light and will add to unsprung weight.
 

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As far as "stance" is concerned, if you're fixated on the appearance of your car, great. But as far as handling goes, how is it that the engineers who designed the geometry of the suspension would not have considered the optimum offset of the wheels? The need for these spacers for anything other than cosmetic appeal would infer some serious incompetence on the part of the engineers.
best regards
Pete
 

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As far as "stance" is concerned, if you're fixated on the appearance of your car, great. But as far as handling goes, how is it that the engineers who designed the geometry of the suspension would not have considered the optimum offset of the wheels? The need for these spacers for anything other than cosmetic appeal would infer some serious incompetence on the part of the engineers.
best regards
Pete
Well...I'm thinking that if you fitted a really big offset you could be starting to screw with the geometry for sure...but when you are getting to 20mm+ and especially when you move from spacers to what are more like adaptors, they have to be getting heavy?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Having wheel spacers installed on your car has many benefits. They allow you to install a bigger brake setup, install wider wheels/tires for performance purposes which also helps in reducing load transfer and help improve your cars handling. As long as your using proper suspension they can help improve many factors on the car.
 

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Fiatbreath can you elaborate. I have some on order!
 

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As far as "stance" is concerned, if you're fixated on the appearance of your car, great. But as far as handling goes, how is it that the engineers who designed the geometry of the suspension would not have considered the optimum offset of the wheels? The need for these spacers for anything other than cosmetic appeal would infer some serious incompetence on the part of the engineers.
best regards
Pete
Optimum offset has a number of compromises when it comes to production vehicles. While this is a sporty vehicle, it is at the end of the day still a production vehicle. I was looking at my Abarth the other day and couldn't believe how much the rear wheels were sunk in. Undoubtedly, if you were to widen the track of the car, you would improve stability by that much.

One of the reasons that OEMs choose offset is due to overspray in the rain. A wheel that sticks out past the body of the car on the front or rear will begin to overspray dirty water onto the car in rainy conditions. Same issue with wide mud tires on trucks. For the front wheels especially, this can mean kicking back rocks that will chip the edges behind the doors or part of the rockers.

The other reason is that I'm certain the OEM knows that these vehicles are prime candidates for modification, so they build in some flexibility for wider wheels.

It's not always so much about incompetence as it is about compromise. This is, after all, still a mass-produced production car.
 

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The problem is , the studs are not mounted in the spacers. So it's a PITA to mount these. I wish there was a simple wheel adapter like the ones I used from H&R on my Porsche.
Actually, this type of spacer is the easiest to install. Here are the installation instructions. Take off the wheel. Place the spacer over the studs. Screw the supplied nuts onto the factory studs. Put the wheel back on.

You don't have to take out the factory studs and replace them with longer studs, which is a real PITA.

My only question is whether these spacers are strong enough, and whether they are centered for the Spider wheels and hubs. Being steel, rather than aluminum, they may not be as prone to failure.
 

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One thing to watch with these type of spacers is that the nuts that hold the spacer on are not visible (or easily accessible) with the wheels installed. And if they loosen up you won't know it until the wheel comes off - this exact thing happened to me years ago and that is why I'm opposed to these types of spacers. If you do use these types of spaces, I would recommend removing the wheels after about 100 miles and re-torquing the nuts and then checking them every 5,000 miles. Or better yet, drill and safety wire the nuts.
 

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One thing to watch with these type of spacers is that the nuts that hold the spacer on are not visible (or easily accessible) with the wheels installed. And if they loosen up you won't know it until the wheel comes off - this exact thing happened to me years ago and that is why I'm opposed to these types of spacers. If you do use these types of spaces, I would recommend removing the wheels after about 100 miles and re-torquing the nuts and then checking them every 5,000 miles. Or better yet, drill and safety wire the nuts.
You bring up a good point. It is good practice (and recommended by some OEMs) that a vehicle is driven for a short period and lugnut torque is re-checked if the wheels are removed for any purpose.

IMO, as long as the wheels are torqued evenly and correctly, and the torque is re-checked as you recommended, there will be no safety concern running these spacers.
 

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Nobody answered my question. What does a 20mm adapter/spacer made from billet steel weigh?
 

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