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Today "Porsche" announces it's version of the future and I for one "like It" .....but What do you think.......?


 

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This sounds hopeful and promising. The concept itself pretty much neutralizes most of the current argument now being used to foist EVs onto the public and into the marketplace. This totally goes against the perceived prevailing movement to eliminate internal combustion engines. A movement that has been signed onto by most all major players around the world and into which these players have invested/committed millions of dollars. If in fact Porsche can bring this about, it's a safe bet the "greenies" will not like the idea or accept it and will do whatever to hinder it or completely block it or make the whole idea disappear all together. This would appear to be rocking the boat just a bit too much. I hope Porsche continues their research and efforts.
 

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This sounds hopeful and promising. The concept itself pretty much neutralizes most of the current argument now being used to foist EVs onto the public and into the marketplace. This totally goes against the perceived prevailing movement to eliminate internal combustion engines. A movement that has been signed onto by most all major players around the world and into which these players have invested/committed millions of dollars. If in fact Porsche can bring this about, it's a safe bet the "greenies" will not like the idea or accept it and will do whatever to hinder it or completely block it or make the whole idea disappear all together. This would appear to be rocking the boat just a bit too much. I hope Porsche continues their research and efforts.
While there is certainly a contingent of pro-EV zealots, the majority of people interested in EVs just want a combination of reduced carbon footprint, less maintenance/running costs, and ability to refuel from home. I'm definitely interested in an EV down the road when the infrastructure catches up, but I'm open to any technology that will make the world less shitty for future generations. If it's synth fuel, so be it.
 

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While there is certainly a contingent of pro-EV zealots, the majority of people interested in EVs just want a combination of reduced carbon footprint, less maintenance/running costs, and ability to refuel from home. I'm definitely interested in an EV down the road when the infrastructure catches up, but I'm open to any technology that will make the world less shitty for future generations. If it's synth fuel, so be it.
I'm definitely not against a cleaner world. In fact I am whole heartedly in favor of it. What I am not in favor of is a world without options, and that seems to be the direction the majority of the auto industry is headed in, poked and prodded along by, as you say, zealots. In fact the zealots at this point seem to be calling all the shots.
My fear would be that as with other popular movements of the day, anything that might cause a pause or deviation in the current momentum will be considered a threat and thus will be met with a negative response. A whole lot of companies and a whole lot more people have $$$$ invested in EVs and have now publicly committed their future toward that end and consequently have much at stake. I find it hard to fathom that those invested will gladly welcome what could possibly be a viable alternative that might very jeopardize their current investment or possible future earnings.
Again, I hope that Porsche and/or others continue in this direction, with this research and development as an alternative to the EV concept/movement which is currently being force fed to those wishing to maintain a level of personal mobility.
 

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That’s super interesting. However, I’ve always wondered why nobody has considered standardizing e85. Yes, fuel economy will be worse but the fuel itself is much cheaper (at least for now), produces more power, is cleaner burning, and I’m sure we could figure out a way to make it run well when it is cold. If we replaced all gas pumps with e85 scarcity wouldn’t be an issue either. Plus, e85 already exists. The only research that may need to be done would be to figure out how to make it start consistently in cold climates.
 

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I don't think your "designer" gasoline will worry the EV industry, considering what this new fuel will probably cost.

20 years from now, when I roll the 124 out of the garage, and carefully pour $400 worth PorschePower eFuel in the tank, (about 2-3 gallons), at least I'll still be able to enjoy the ICE sound.
 

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Honestly, I wouldn't worry about the death of ICE for decades to come, at least in the US. There are significant logistical hurdles to overcome, not entirely based on the technology. Geography, climate, and cultural differences will slow EV dominance here.
 
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Honestly, I wouldn't worry about the death of ICE for decades to come, at least in the US. There are significant logistical hurdles to overcome, not entirely based on the technology. Geography, climate, and cultural differences will slow EV dominance here.
I would agree, we will not see the death of the conventional ICE as we now know but we we see it severely restricted, limited and eventually chocked out within the marketplace and thus it's availability to the general public. GM has already come out and announced their goal, their corporate mission is to phase out all gasoline and diesel vehicles by 2035. Ford has said they will be all electric in Europe by 2030 so one cannot imagine their plans for the US market being too far behind.
EVs are not a case of what the market wants or what the market is clamoring for, it's a case of what the market is going to get. This is Henry Ford's idea of giving the buying public any color car they wants as long as it's black run amuck. Go to your nearest/favorite brand dealer in 10 or 15 years and you will be able to order any drivetrain combo/option you want as along as it's the specified electric for any given model. And if you are really fortunate you might have 2 models from which to choose.
Agreed, the conventional ICE will be around for years to come. And we will all have antique auto plates on our vehicles in which they reside and we will be purchase our fuel in 1 gallon cans at premium prices from federally licensed dealers.
 

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Today "Porsche" announces it's version of the future and I for one "like It" .....but What do you think.......?


I shudder to think of our fragile electrical grids providing energy to hundreds of millions of E-vehicles.
 

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I would agree, we will not see the death of the conventional ICE as we now know but we we see it severely restricted, limited and eventually chocked out within the marketplace and thus it's availability to the general public. GM has already come out and announced their goal, their corporate mission is to phase out all gasoline and diesel vehicles by 2035. Ford has said they will be all electric in Europe by 2030 so one cannot imagine their plans for the US market being too far behind.
EVs are not a case of what the market wants or what the market is clamoring for, it's a case of what the market is going to get. This is Henry Ford's idea of giving the buying public any color car they wants as long as it's black run amuck. Go to your nearest/favorite brand dealer in 10 or 15 years and you will be able to order any drivetrain combo/option you want as along as it's the specified electric for any given model. And if you are really fortunate you might have 2 models from which to choose.
Agreed, the conventional ICE will be around for years to come. And we will all have antique auto plates on our vehicles in which they reside and we will be purchase our fuel in 1 gallon cans at premium prices from federally licensed dealers.
Manufacturers have usually catered to what the customer wants to buy, i.e. the death of the 500 and the 124 Spider in the US, regardless of regulations, as the supercharged V8 Hellcats are selling well. Products also tend to follow the natural progression of technology, like horse drawn carriages, incandescent bulbs, manual transmissions and eventually for some, the ICE will fall, not because the manufacturer doesn't want you to have a choice but because it simply doesn't sell.
 

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Given that I am on the initial stages of ownership of my two vehicles (my Spider has 8,600 miles; my Jeep 6,500 miles), and the influx of electric vehicles scheduled to hit the market, I am in no rush to go out and buy another ICE vehicle.

Whenever the time comes to trade in the Jeep, 3, 4 or 5 years down the road, I’ll see what the powertrain offerings on off-road vehicles are at that point.

Per the Spider, I have no desire to get rid of it for the foreseeable future. It suits my needs for a fun, secondary car, perfectly. Besides, I don’t see Mazda, of any other automaker, spending the time and money developing an affordable, electric roadster any time soon, given the segment’s tiny size.
 
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EVs are great for the average consumer. Instant startup, greatly reduced maintenance costs and lower cost to operate. I have no idea if/when they will be able to do a 5-700 mile day, day after day.
Repair shops hate them, what does go wrong they can't safely touch. I'd have one for around town shopping, etc. But, I'm not going to buy one that costs more than my 124 (or my GTI) and is far less fun to drive.
Can you actually drive one across country if you want to take secondary highways?

Mike
 

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EVs are great for the average consumer. Instant startup, greatly reduced maintenance costs and lower cost to operate. I have no idea if/when they will be able to do a 5-700 mile day, day after day.
Repair shops hate them, what does go wrong they can't safely touch. I'd have one for around town shopping, etc. But, I'm not going to buy one that costs more than my 124 (or my GTI) and is far less fun to drive.
Can you actually drive one across country if you want to take secondary highways?

Mike
I don't know what you consider an average consumer but my EV also has a gas engine for when I go out of town, but it was always designed to be an interim solution until full EVs would become affordable and quick to charge. The best part is waking up to a full "tank" that would cover my daily drive and not having to get in a gas station for months at a time. Newer EVs can charge at around 15 miles per minute, my gas stops during road trips usually take around 30 minutes due to bathroom breaks for me my wife and dogs that always travel with us, so that would give us 450 additional miles which is at the top of the range of what we would drive in a day.

Can you actually drive one across country if you want to take secondary highways? Good question, maybe, but realistically, how many here would do this frequently? Before I permanently moved to the States, I bought a 2004 Italian Aprilia Scarabeo 500 in Key West and the following day started riding towards San Francisco. After a month, started my ride back to FL. That was 15 years ago and there is absolutely no way I would do that again in a bike, very unlikely in my Prima, possibly in a very comfy car or SUV rental because I wouldn't want to put all those miles on a personal car. My point is, purchasing a car for a once in a lifetime trip is unrealistic for the 99% of us.
 
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