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2018 Fiat 124 Spider Abarth
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For those of you who use ramps to lift your Spider, can you share which ones are you using?

I got a pair of Pittsburgh steel ramps from Harbor Freight — see below — but the Spider is too low; the front bumper touched well before the tires did. I had to return them.

I was then looking at the RhinoGear plastic Rhino Ramps — bottom — but, according to the online reviews they slide all over the garage floor when you try to drive onto them.

Any other ones you guys know for a fact that will work and you’d recommend?

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I have an old set like the one in the first picture, but anything lower than an SUV will not clear them. My cheap and durable solution was to use two 2X8 boards about 4 feet long. On one end, I drove two control arm bolts trough them the width of two of the holes in the ramps so the boards latch on to the ramps like a big snake's fangs. Then screwed down a long piece of thick rubber matting used for walking on with ice skates so the tires always grip on their way up. I built that maybe 10 years ago and have used it for all my lowered vehicles since. It's held up great.

My crude diagram. The red is the hockey skate mat. It's about 3/4" thick.




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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the link!

Looks like Rhino Ramps works for most Spiderisi.

That online reviewer must have had a uniquely slipper garage floor...
 

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2018 Abarth 124 Spider, Mare Blue / Nero Abarth Leather, Brembo's, Record Monza, Automatic
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I think I'm going to need to buy more. A lot more.
View attachment 93004
OMG @Chipshot ! Those ramps are so good! They work for me! Either raw in a salad w/olive oil and balsamic vinegar or sauteed with fiddleheads and olive oil alongside your fresh caught Brook Trout! (Or many other combos) Very worth the effort to stop and harvest on your walks in the woods! Best, s. (PS: don't forget to grab a bottle of your favorite Italian wine, brought home in an Italian sports car 😃)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
My Rhino Ramps arrived today.

The good:
  1. The Spider bumper clears the ramps
  2. The ramps are sturdy, lightweight and easy to maneuver
  3. I was able to look under my Spider for the first time in 3.5 years
The bad:
  1. The ramps have no traction on the garage floor. Every time I tried to driver onto them, the ramps slid away. I ended up lodging them against an indentation between the driveway and the garage floor threshold
  2. I finally saw what the dealers have been doing down there. The shield under the engine was missing two bolts and the ones that were there were loose.
I don’t know who lost the two bolts, the Fiat dealer that replaced the pump, or the CDJR dealer that did the last oil change.

When I picked up the Spider from the last oil change at the CDJR dealer, the car came out with a loud racket from the bottom when I shifted into first gear. The car went back into the service bay and they discovered that they forgot to tighten the shield. Well, apparently they didn’t tighten it well and on top of that misplaced two of the bolts. How incompetent can dealers be?
 

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2018 Abarth 124 Spider, Mare Blue / Nero Abarth Leather, Brembo's, Record Monza, Automatic
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Hi @Aldo, OMG - loose, stripped, or missing belly pan bolts are so common! I worked right next to a guy for a couple of years that used a 3/8" Impact driver to tighten 8mm headed screw that held on a plastic undercar splash shield that has to be removed to do an oil/filter change. Plus, no anti seize lube. The next guy that got the car for an oil change would end up breaking screws off (too tight) or stripping threads. (too tight or corroded, no anti seize). Asked why he kept doing this - because it costs the techs who care money and time - he replied "I don't have time for that shit, they don't pay me to care!". There are some root causes and when all combined create a horrid situation. A) Flat Rate pay system: the tech gets paid .3hr. -.4hr. at his hourly rate to find the car and get it safely on his lift, complete a oil change, multi- point inspection, incl. check/adjust tire pressure, fill washer jug, coolant jug, etc, reset oil life indicator, and get the car to the wash guy. B) Attitude: Some guys just don't give a shit, period, about quality. They only care about how much money they make, how many hours they turn. I often hear bragging about how many hours a guy turns in a week. Not all techs are like this - many guys take real pride in a job well done, and "Fixing it Right the First Time". Trick is to find the right tech at your shop and ask for him specifically . . . Any given shop can employ both types, and sometimes it takes a shop months or years to establish that any one tech has a high enough percentage of botched jobs and comebacks to be able to fire said bad tech without inviting law suits or other trouble. C) Management presses techs to increase production. I don't know how many times I've heard it over the years: "We need you guys to pick up the pace - we need you to produce a minimum of "xx" hours per week, or . . . " and similar. The next thing out of their mouths is " We have had a lot of comebacks lately, so we need you to do it right the first time . . . ". Well, this is contradictory for sure. There was this wise old Chinese guy that lived about a million years ago that said something quite profound. When translated into English he said "Haste makes Waste". Just as true today as it was then. When I reminded one service manager of this he said "Ya, I know. I'm just passing on what upper management wants me to say . . . You are right. I didn't say that". Hmmm . . . (Fyi: upper management is a rare sight in the shop, they don't know what it's like to work on modern cars, they just look at the numbers and demand more. (This is a generalization - not all upper management is like this - but a lot are)). Good Luck finding a great tech and a great shop Aldo, they are out there! Best, s
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PS: This is a drain plug I pulled out of a car while changing the oil. How the F did this happen? Over torqued? The guy that did the last oil change put the impact gun to it? Or did the owner piss the tech off so the tech felt it necessary to take a sawzall to the drain plug before putting it back in? I have no idea, but this is what it looked like when I pulled it out. No excuse for this shit, and if I was this techs boss and knew he did that I would have fired him on the spot! Immediately! I just don't understand what goes on in some guys heads. Sorry to go on for so long, but it's hard to keep all this bottled up . . . The good techs pay a big price because of stuff like this . . It's the good techs that get to fix the stuff the idiots F up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
OMG, this quote summarizes most dealers’ attitude:
"I don't have time for that shit, they don't pay me to care!"
:ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:


No wonder they do shit work.
 

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I’ve had ramps slide when being pushed by bodywork (other cars) but not just from contact with a rolling tire. I suppose it also has to do with how smooth/polished/painted your garage floor is, tire diameter, and ramp angle. Also my Rhino Ramps are somewhat vintage:

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…not the current design:

2022 Hopkins Aftermarket Catalog

Mine have a rubber pad/grip under the leading edge:

Rectangle Grey Wood Road surface Gas


…I don’t know how they compare to the non-skid feet on the current version.


I use Laser ramps for getting a few inches of lift, sometimes just for getting the end of this car high enough to then place my jack under the front or rear center lift point:

Laser Tools 5669 Car Ramps - Low Rise

Laser Tools Low Rise Car Ramps

They present a lower angle than the Rhino Ramps:

Tire Wheel Automotive tire Automotive lighting Tread

Automotive tire Automotive design Automotive lighting Bumper Motor vehicle


No grips on the bottom, but on my smooth-but-not-polished garage floor I can drive up forwards or backwards with these at the front or rear, no drama.
 

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Never used them with the Spider, but I have a set of Race Ramps that I've used with my C6 Corvette that has about 3" of clearance under the front air dam. I have the extensions that Race Ramps offer for extremely low vehicles (not needed for stock Spiders). They were pretty expensive, but I bought them because they were about the only ramps that worked for the low-clearance Corvette at that time. I've had no problem with the ramps sliding on the floor.

I would try putting down a rubber mat under your ramps. Just make sure there is enough rubber mat for the tires to rest on before they hit the ramps, and I'd bet you won't get any slide..
 

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I’ve had ramps slide when being pushed by bodywork (other cars) but not just from contact with a rolling tire. I suppose it also has to do with how smooth/polished/painted your garage floor is, tire diameter, and ramp angle. Also my Rhino Ramps are somewhat vintage:

View attachment 93329

…not the current design:

2022 Hopkins Aftermarket Catalog

Mine have a rubber pad/grip under the leading edge:

View attachment 93330

…I don’t know how they compare to the non-skid feet on the current version.


I use Laser ramps for getting a few inches of lift, sometimes just for getting the end of this car high enough to then place my jack under the front or rear center lift point:

Laser Tools 5669 Car Ramps - Low Rise

Laser Tools Low Rise Car Ramps

They present a lower angle than the Rhino Ramps:

View attachment 93332
View attachment 93331

No grips on the bottom, but on my smooth-but-not-polished garage floor I can drive up forwards or backwards with these at the front or rear, no drama.
I have the same "old school" Rhino ramps and have no issues on my (non-lowered) car. Clearance is tight, but in general, they do not slide. On one of my ramps the plastic surrounding the rubber at the base of the ramp broke, so I have to always ensure the non-slip rubber feet are in place, but otherwise it's been smooth sailing.

I'd assume the newer, more hip looking Rhino ramps may be even better.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I have the newer, hipper Rhino ramps: they slide all over the garage floor. I have to wedge them against a rut on the floor to keep them from slipping.

The last thing I want is my Spider to drop on one side and get hung up on the other...
 
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