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Hi all,

I have a 2017 FIAT Spider Abarth and I recently purchased an SD Navigation card for the car but I’m trying to change the location that is linked to the SD CARD and change it to my State. Is there any way of changing the location linked? Do I need to get a new antenna?

any help would be appreciated!
 

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Not quite sure what you're running into. But no, you don't need a new antenna.

As soon as a new nav SD chip is inserted in the vehicle, after driving for 60 miles (100km) the card becomes VIN locked to your vehicle.

There is no state linked to the card, other than it does remember what was last used for navigation purposes. What I would suggest is to drive a few minutes away from your home, park the vehicle and do a navigation load to find your home address. The next time you enter a destination, by default it will go to the state last searched. You can also take the opportunity to set your "home" address in the system at the same time. I can say that the process for selecting a different state is not overly intuitive, but once you've done it a couple of times its easy enough to remember.

You may want to check out Ameridan's blog site, as it has some excellent reference information regarding navigation and many other topics associated with our vehicles. He's a member of this forum, and here's the link to his site:
21st Century Fiat / Abarth 124 Spider

...and here's the specific section that talks about navigation settings... scroll down till you hit a box full of text under a heading called "more quirks", and you'll see what's required to select a new state.
Navigation
 

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Great write up. However I would suggest never putting your exact home address in any Sat Nav....... maybe 1 mile away would be better. There have been instances in the past where thieves steal a car, set the Sav Nav to "Home", then go and break into the house knowing that the owner/driver is out looking for his/her car !!! My "Home" is set to my local supermarket.
 

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Great write up. However I would suggest never putting your exact home address in any Sat Nav....... maybe 1 mile away would be better. There have been instances in the past where thieves steal a car, set the Sav Nav to "Home", then go and break into the house knowing that the owner/driver is out looking for his/her car !!! My "Home" is set to my local supermarket.
A good example of everyone having a different level of risk tollerance and what they do to address it.

The only times I've heard of this happening were with folks that were using portable GPS units (like Garmin, TomTom, etc.). The thieves would break into the car, steal the nav unit, and then use the address to find the home for a break in. With a built in nav, that becomes more of a challenge, because you have to defeat the car's own security system and replicate the function of your fob to power up the systems. That can be done, but it's neither trivial nor easy. Far simpler for a thief to steal your phone while you're out shopping, and phones are a treasure trove of personal and financial data access.

In my case, when I'm away from home, I use a huge steering wheel lock that would require cutting off nearly half of the steering wheel to remove it. And then the thieves would still need to find a way to bypass having the fob to start the vehilce or even apply power to the accessory functions to read an address from the infotainment system. This isn't something I lose sleep over (Smith & Wesson tell me I should sleep like a baby, but I don't advertise they live with me). Mostly because to transmit the rolling code you either need to have someone stand next to you while you repeatedly press your fob to get a large enough sample to be effective, or to have someone stand next to you with a booster while their buddy stands next to your car to get in and start it.

Don't get me wrong. Although I personally don't perceive the risk high enough to warrant never putting my home address in my car's nav system, if that's something that worries you, then yeah... Arthur and fiatmidway124 have provided solid advice. Don't put your address in. Or put somewhere else as your "home" address. Or just don't set the home address at all. Those are all good options.

Semi-related aside. A few years ago, a US investigative news team sent a letter to something like 30 felons currently serving time for B&E crimes, asking them to anonymously answer a series of questions regarding how they chose their targets and what, if anything, deterred them. Security systems or alarm systems.... mixed. Some said they would move on, others said it made no difference in their decision. Got a big sign that says "Castle Law Practiced Here" or your car has an NRA bumper sticker? Nope.... they said that sort of stuff indicated a potential target with nice weapons to steal. The two biggest deterrants were "a huge dog... not a small yappy one", and number one on the list.... the sound of a TV or radio playing inside. All of the responsants to the survey noted that if they heard a TV or radio playing inside the home, they'd move on because the odds were strong that someone was actually home.

Second related aside: On the fob booster part of the story, it seems that soemthing that's being done now is for thieves to use signal boosters in a team effort to steal cars from personal property. If the owner leaves their keys on a table or basket in proximity to the entrance of the home, one of the pair will stand near the door with a booster in an attempt to pick up the signal, which is then relayed to a partner next to the car, thus allowing it to be opened and started. Alternately, they can use the booster to transmit the data to a device to replicate an operational fob for future use. The recommended means to ensure this doesn't happen is to either leave your keys in a more central location in the home, or store them in an RFID blocking sleeve, similar to the ones used for credit cards.

It's the age old game of tag and seek. Technology changes to enhance security, immediately followed by crooks savvy enough to bypass it. And the cycle continues....

Sorry... too much time on my hands at home these days, combined with keyboarding skill. Bad combination.

End of rant. lol
 
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A good example of everyone having a different level of risk tollerance and what they do to address it.

The only times I've heard of this happening were with folks that were using portable GPS units (like Garmin, TomTom, etc.). The thieves would break into the car, steal the nav unit, and then use the address to find the home for a break in. With a built in nav, that becomes more of a challenge, because you have to defeat the car's own security system and replicate the function of your fob to power up the systems. That can be done, but it's neither trivial nor easy. Far simpler for a thief to steal your phone while you're out shopping, and phones are a treasure trove of personal and financial data access.

In my case, when I'm away from home, I use a huge steering wheel lock that would require cutting off nearly half of the steering wheel to remove it. And then the thieves would still need to find a way to bypass having the fob to start the vehilce or even apply power to the accessory functions to read an address from the infotainment system. This isn't something I lose sleep over (Smith & Wesson tell me I should sleep like a baby, but I don't advertise they live with me). Mostly because to transmit the rolling code you either need to have someone stand next to you while you repeatedly press your fob to get a large enough sample to be effective, or to have someone stand next to you with a booster while their buddy stands next to your car to get in and start it.

Don't get me wrong. Although I personally don't perceive the risk high enough to warrant never putting my home address in my car's nav system, if that's something that worries you, then yeah... Arthur and fiatmidway124 have provided solid advice. Don't put your address in. Or put somewhere else as your "home" address. Or just don't set the home address at all. Those are all good options.

Semi-related aside. A few years ago, a US investigative news team sent a letter to something like 30 felons currently serving time for B&E crimes, asking them to anonymously answer a series of questions regarding how they chose their targets and what, if anything, deterred them. Security systems or alarm systems.... mixed. Some said they would move on, others said it made no difference in their decision. Got a big sign that says "Castle Law Practiced Here" or your car has an NRA bumper sticker? Nope.... they said that sort of stuff indicated a potential target with nice weapons to steal. The two biggest deterrants were "a huge dog... not a small yappy one", and number one on the list.... the sound of a TV or radio playing inside. All of the responsants to the survey noted that if they heard a TV or radio playing inside the home, they'd move on because the odds were strong that someone was actually home.

Second related aside: On the fob booster part of the story, it seems that soemthing that's being done now is for thieves to use signal boosters in a team effort to steal cars from personal property. If the owner leaves their keys on a table or basket in proximity to the entrance of the home, one of the pair will stand near the door with a booster in an attempt to pick up the signal, which is then relayed to a partner next to the car, thus allowing it to be opened and started. Alternately, they can use the booster to transmit the data to a device to replicate an operational fob for future use. The recommended means to ensure this doesn't happen is to either leave your keys in a more central location in the home, or store them in an RFID blocking sleeve, similar to the ones used for credit cards.

It's the age old game of tag and seek. Technology changes to enhance security, immediately followed by crooks savvy enough to bypass it. And the cycle continues....

Sorry... too much time on my hands at home these days, combined with keyboarding skill. Bad combination.

End of rant. lol
Great write up !!! I guess our 124s are secure enough..... I was thinking more of how it used to be in the early days of aftermarket Sat Navs. Re the Faraday cage, my keys live in a cast iron Le Creuset casserole pot when not in use.......... and I've got a very vicious cat as well. ? (y)
 
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