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Discussion Starter #1
Just picked up my 124 Lusso a week ago. Love the car. Yesterday I tried out the tire compressor that came with the car and it worked quite well. However, the can of sealant Fiat provides with car is not something I want to try in case of a flat. I had 1 very bad experience with the stuff years ago and no way again. I've used plugs for years on the occasional flat and have never had a problem.I left the plug in and drove with it until the tires needed replacing. I believe I'm going to do the same with my Fiat. I ordered a kit to keep in the trunk. I would love to hear if anyone thinks that is not an acceptable substitute. Thanks in advance and I really enjoy this forum and the wealth of knowledge that's here.

Bill B.
 

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Yep...good idea...i

Just picked up my 124 Lusso a week ago. Love the car. Yesterday I tried out the tire compressor that came with the car and it worked quite well. However, the can of sealant Fiat provides with car is not something I want to try in case of a flat. I had 1 very bad experience with the stuff years ago and no way again. I've used plugs for years on the occasional flat and have never had a problem.I left the plug in and drove with it until the tires needed replacing. I believe I'm going to do the same with my Fiat. I ordered a kit to keep in the trunk. I would love to hear if anyone thinks that is not an acceptable substitute. Thanks in advance and I really enjoy this forum and the wealth of knowledge that's here.

Bill B.
Picked up a plug kit at Walmart and threw it into the trunk as backup for the tire compressor. At first tire change, I'm going with Michelin Run Flats, for a little more piece of mind...;)
 

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Some say that tire fixers hate Fix a Flat, but I like it. I've always got a can in each car. Recently I was able to help a friend with his flat. I agree with your opinion on our flat tire solution.
As far as tire busters woes are concerned, it comes with the territory.
Best regards
Pete
 

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the plug kit is a great solution. but also you may want to check and make sure you have a jack and tire iron in your cars. a rear wheel puncture is going to be next to impossible to plug on the car. also I addition you may also want to get a set of diagonal cutting pliers (dykes) they work great to pull nails and screws from the tire tread and also come in handy to trim off the excess of the plug once inserted..... yes I did work at a gas station in my youth (back when there were full service gas stations).
 

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Discussion Starter #5
the plug kit is a great solution. but also you may want to check and make sure you have a jack and tire iron in your cars. a rear wheel puncture is going to be next to impossible to plug on the car. also I addition you may also want to get a set of diagonal cutting pliers (dykes) they work great to pull nails and screws from the tire tread and also come in handy to trim off the excess of the plug once inserted..... yes I did work at a gas station in my youth (back when there were full service gas stations).
I have put together a tool kit and dykes and needle nose are included. I just ordered and received today a plug kit off Amazon. It is the "Stop and Go Tire Plugger" tubeless tire repair kit. It has the mushroom head plugs. Cost was a bit over $40.

From what I am reading it looks like a Miata scissor jack would do the trick for lifting the car if I had to for tire repair. Not getting underneath a car without jack stands. Can anyone help me with what year Miata jack is best or perhaps another type jack.

I just joined the forum yesterday and it's fantastic with all the help and advice.

Bill B.
 

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the plug kit is a great solution. but also you may want to check and make sure you have a jack and tire iron in your cars. a rear wheel puncture is going to be next to impossible to plug on the car. also I addition you may also want to get a set of diagonal cutting pliers (dykes) they work great to pull nails and screws from the tire tread and also come in handy to trim off the excess of the plug once inserted..... yes I did work at a gas station in my youth (back when there were full service gas stations).
I have always kept a plug kit in my car and I wholeheartedly agree that a good pair of dykes should be included in that kit.
 

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Discussion Starter #9

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Bill B. If you look closely at the second picture on the listing you will see how the jack fits snugly in it's receptacle.

The handle and tow hook simply pack in the supplied pouch, and lay in the wheel well by the jack, all concealed by the velcro
fastened flexible panel. There is a threaded fastener to which you attach the supplied yellow knob to secure the jack in place.
 

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For a tire plug kit, I like the one from Slime with the T-handled rasp and plug insertion tool. I've had to plug tires on a bike and on cars, and the cheaper ones with the straight handles can be next to impossible to get a grip on to insert the plug... especially if it's raining (don't ask!). I've plugged plenty of tires over the years, and have had pretty good fortune with the plug being a permanent solution until it was time for a tire change. Just had to plug a tire in my Dart a couple weeks ago, in fact. Just re-taped the package on the plug kit and put it back in my tool pouch. And as was said, a pair of needle-nose pliers or similar, esp. if they have a 45 deg. tip, can be super handy at getting a near-headless nail or whatever out of the tread. I've also had to just poke an object into the wheel to get it out of the way to plug a tire before, but took it straight to a tire shop once it was aired back up.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
For a tire plug kit, I like the one from Slime with the T-handled rasp and plug insertion tool. I've had to plug tires on a bike and on cars, and the cheaper ones with the straight handles can be next to impossible to get a grip on to insert the plug... especially if it's raining (don't ask!). I've plugged plenty of tires over the years, and have had pretty good fortune with the plug being a permanent solution until it was time for a tire change. Just had to plug a tire in my Dart a couple weeks ago, in fact. Just re-taped the package on the plug kit and put it back in my tool pouch. And as was said, a pair of needle-nose pliers or similar, esp. if they have a 45 deg. tip, can be super handy at getting a near-headless nail or whatever out of the tread. I've also had to just poke an object into the wheel to get it out of the way to plug a tire before, but took it straight to a tire shop once it was aired back up.
Deyeme Racing......You obviously have more experience with tires and wheels than I do but I'm wondering why if you had to push a nail or such on thru into a wheel what harm it would do to leave it there until next tire change. I'm just asking the question for my own knowledge. If I was in some isolated area and needed to push a nail on thru to plug the tire I wouldn't give it a second thought. Perhaps I'm wrong and need to be educated.

Bill B.
 

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Deyeme Racing......You obviously have more experience with tires and wheels than I do but I'm wondering why if you had to push a nail or such on thru into a wheel what harm it would do to leave it there until next tire change. I'm just asking the question for my own knowledge. If I was in some isolated area and needed to push a nail on thru to plug the tire I wouldn't give it a second thought. Perhaps I'm wrong and need to be educated.

Bill B.
I don't know for sure that it would have damaged anything, but at low speeds, it bobbled and rattled around, and at higher speed, I would guess that it would just get pinned by g-force to the inside of the tire, creating a tiny imbalance, but I'm not sure. At any rate, I didn't have anything with me at the time to pry the object out, so punching it into the tire with the rasp was the only solution. I think that was on my Ninja 650 that happened on. Not a lot of room for tools on a motorcycle ;) And since there's only two tires holding you off the pavement on a bike, I opted for the safer route, and got it to the shop ASAP.
 

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I don't know for sure that it would have damaged anything, but at low speeds, it bobbled and rattled around, and at higher speed, I would guess that it would just get pinned by g-force to the inside of the tire, creating a tiny imbalance, but I'm not sure. At any rate, I didn't have anything with me at the time to pry the object out, so punching it into the tire with the rasp was the only solution. I think that was on my Ninja 650 that happened on. Not a lot of room for tools on a motorcycle ;) And since there's only two tires holding you off the pavement on a bike, I opted for the safer route, and got it to the shop ASAP.
driving around with a nail or screw in a tire is ok, except it is/will leak, perhaps slowly at first, but it will leak. when you plug a tire it does not leak (generally speaking) if done properly and the tire is not beyond repair. having been working for the police in new orleans during katrina and it's aftermath. I was regularly collecting metal in the tires of my police car. I used tire plugs to repair my tires. at one point I had 12 plugs in one tire and it was holding air (without losing pressure) before I had the opportunity to get it replaced. a plug is also a permanent repair, so it is a fix it and forget it until the tire needs replacement........ just my $ 0.02
 

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Hey Guys: a word of caution about plugging tires. Having owned my own shop for over 30 years, we must have plugged hundreds of tires without issue. I plug tires to this day, as long as the nail is in the tread area.

Plugging tires is generally OK, UNLESS THE TIRE WAS RUN COMPLETELY FLAT. In that event, sidewall damage is inevitable, and an inspection of the inside sidewall is called for. There will usually be an amount of rubber dust/powder due to abrasion as a result of running flat. If the residue is minimal, the tire can be fixed. If it's excessive, the tire is not serviceable, and potentially dangerous (blow out) due to weak sidewall. Simply re-inflating the tire and plugging it is not enough.

You will find that the majority of shops/tire chains will opt to patch a tire from the inside rather than plug it. The rationale is that it offers an opportunity to inspect the inside of the tire to make sure it is serviceable, and to avoid any potential liability.
This is also a recommendation of the Rubber Manufacturer's Association (RMA), I believe that's the correct name.
 
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