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Thanks for the update. Regards your original problem, it is imperative to replace all fob batteries at 12 month intervals.
In the absence of any further evidence, I believe this is what your issue was. Glad it is now sorted.
I replaced 2 of the three key fob batteries while trying to fix the issue (I only had two batteries "in stock") and the dealership have not done anything with the key, so I am confident it unfortunately wasnt the issue (unfortunately as it would have been an easy fix)

I am now just worried about reoccurence after may when the warranty runs out.
 

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I replaced 2 of the three key fob batteries while trying to fix the issue (I only had two batteries "in stock") and the dealership have not done anything with the key, so I am confident it unfortunately wasnt the issue (unfortunately as it would have been an easy fix)

I am now just worried about reoccurence after may when the warranty runs out.
It's all about the Fob Batteries, followed by actual battery. They don't like being left unused and get very grumpy if they are. It's a year since I changed all three but the time is nigh for fob battery change again. A low cost precaution to what can turn into a real faff. Mine is a November 2016 A124, so adding a couple more fob batteries to the annual costs bill is only a couple of missed coffees at Costa or Starbucks!
 

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Discussion Starter #43
It's all about the Fob Batteries, followed by actual battery. They don't like being left unused and get very grumpy if they are. It's a year since I changed all three but the time is nigh for fob battery change again. A low cost precaution to what can turn into a real faff. Mine is a November 2016 A124, so adding a couple more fob batteries to the annual costs bill is only a couple of missed coffees at Costa or Starbucks!
I definitely agree that a lot of weird behaviour with the keys is most commonly solved by a simple battery replacement. This should always be the first port of call. However issues should not and to my knowledge can not arise by the fob being left unused or left to go dead. They are very resilient devices in their design and the design of the fob which is a Mitsubishi unit is used by a huge population of cars and manufacturers across the world. If the fob were the issue we would know about that, and it surely wouldn't be an issue for long.

In their keyless function all they do is listen for a wake signal on low frequency (Which only travels a few metres in clear LOS) ~125 KHz and respond over 433MHz /315 MHz (depending on your country) with a code, which is picked up by the car. Allowing it to initiate the ignition. The code is picked from a really long "list" that comes pre-programmed on the remote from the factory. The wake signal sent out never changes for our cars. And so the signal the fob is listening for is also pre-programmed. Meaning there is very little to go wrong. And its basically impossible without damage to the remote for it to forget the "list" of codes. (It's not an actual list its an algorithm that runs nowadays). This system is a microcontroller based system, in other words, extremely reliable and consistent.

In my opinion these issues arise from the car no longer recognising the codes and the signature of the keys. Not the other way around. Definitely not just from the batteries of the remote going dead. It's possible for damage of the fob to cause it to no longer to receive or send signals but the chances of both keys failing at the exact same time in the exact same way are astronomically small. Even smaller still for a failure of that kind to be caused by a dead batter.

I feel like you meant well with your comment but it doesn't help to perpetuate myths even if in your personal experience the cause and effect seem to align. I just wanted to clarify this point because I've done an immense amount of research and my own RF testing and validation on my remotes and car. Mainly because I absolutely hate the lack of transparency of modern day dealers and mechanics. No one is willing to give you a straight answer which leads to tonnes of headaches and speculation on forums just like this.
 

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I definitely agree that a lot of weird behaviour with the keys is most commonly solved by a simple battery replacement. This should always be the first port of call. However issues should not and to my knowledge can not arise by the fob being left unused or left to go dead. They are very resilient devices in their design and the design of the fob which is a Mitsubishi unit is used by a huge population of cars and manufacturers across the world. If the fob were the issue we would know about that, and it surely wouldn't be an issue for long.

In their keyless function all they do is listen for a wake signal on low frequency (Which only travels a few metres in clear LOS) ~125 KHz and respond over 433MHz /315 MHz (depending on your country) with a code, which is picked up by the car. Allowing it to initiate the ignition. The code is picked from a really long "list" that comes pre-programmed on the remote from the factory. The wake signal sent out never changes for our cars. And so the signal the fob is listening for is also pre-programmed. Meaning there is very little to go wrong. And its basically impossible without damage to the remote for it to forget the "list" of codes. (It's not an actual list its an algorithm that runs nowadays). This system is a microcontroller based system, in other words, extremely reliable and consistent.

In my opinion these issues arise from the car no longer recognising the codes and the signature of the keys. Not the other way around. Definitely not just from the batteries of the remote going dead. It's possible for damage of the fob to cause it to no longer to receive or send signals but the chances of both keys failing at the exact same time in the exact same way are astronomically small. Even smaller still for a failure of that kind to be caused by a dead batter.

I feel like you meant well with your comment but it doesn't help to perpetuate myths even if in your personal experience the cause and effect seem to align. I just wanted to clarify this point because I've done an immense amount of research and my own RF testing and validation on my remotes and car. Mainly because I absolutely hate the lack of transparency of modern day dealers and mechanics. No one is willing to give you a straight answer which leads to tonnes of headaches and speculation on forums just like this.
I really appreciate this response. It’s the first time I’ve ever come across a clear explanation of how this system works, or that it originated from Mitsubishi. Would you know if there is a replaceable component in the car, or is it part of some inseparable assembly? (I hate those!)
Best regards
Pete
 

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Chalk one up for the good ol key in the ignition and the turning of the tumbler to crank away till she starts.

On a different, and hopefully better note, my wife (ICU nurse) took care of a really sick guy (covid) and when he pulled through, (it was touch and go she said) he told my wife she that can come on down, he works for Interstate Battery, and he'll take care of her.

So I've got that going for me......which is nice....(gunga galunga)
 

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I definitely agree that a lot of weird behaviour with the keys is most commonly solved by a simple battery replacement. This should always be the first port of call. However issues should not and to my knowledge can not arise by the fob being left unused or left to go dead. They are very resilient devices in their design and the design of the fob which is a Mitsubishi unit is used by a huge population of cars and manufacturers across the world. If the fob were the issue we would know about that, and it surely wouldn't be an issue for long.

In their keyless function all they do is listen for a wake signal on low frequency (Which only travels a few metres in clear LOS) ~125 KHz and respond over 433MHz /315 MHz (depending on your country) with a code, which is picked up by the car. Allowing it to initiate the ignition. The code is picked from a really long "list" that comes pre-programmed on the remote from the factory. The wake signal sent out never changes for our cars. And so the signal the fob is listening for is also pre-programmed. Meaning there is very little to go wrong. And its basically impossible without damage to the remote for it to forget the "list" of codes. (It's not an actual list its an algorithm that runs nowadays). This system is a microcontroller based system, in other words, extremely reliable and consistent.

In my opinion these issues arise from the car no longer recognising the codes and the signature of the keys. Not the other way around. Definitely not just from the batteries of the remote going dead. It's possible for damage of the fob to cause it to no longer to receive or send signals but the chances of both keys failing at the exact same time in the exact same way are astronomically small. Even smaller still for a failure of that kind to be caused by a dead batter.

I feel like you meant well with your comment but it doesn't help to perpetuate myths even if in your personal experience the cause and effect seem to align. I just wanted to clarify this point because I've done an immense amount of research and my own RF testing and validation on my remotes and car. Mainly because I absolutely hate the lack of transparency of modern day dealers and mechanics. No one is willing to give you a straight answer which leads to tonnes of headaches and speculation on forums just like this.
I did mean well in sharing my own experience of my A124 not starting after a short period out of use at end of 2019 that required new battery and new fob batteries. Not sure I'm perpetuating any myth since my sister in law also has an A124 as a daily driver. Hers is a 2018, but she experienced same downside of no access to car, dead battery. Fobs doing nothing. Replacing all 3 batteries returned her car to rude health.
Preventative maintenance suggestions /experience like this have to be a good share on the Forum?
My Dealer experience is rather poor too, but in your case I would have lifted to get Fiat /Abarth involved... That usually helps, again from my personal experience most recently in September 20 with my son's A595 exhaust issue. G
 

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Hiya

Yes I agree preventative measures are good to share and I understand your post was meant well.

However I think you are addressing a different problem and for me at least I felt the fact that replacing keyfob batteries making no difference is mentioned several times in the thread already just added to an already frustrating situation.

No offence meant :)
 

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Hiya

Yes I agree preventative measures are good to share and I understand your post was meant well.

However I think you are addressing a different problem and for me at least I felt the fact that replacing keyfob batteries making no difference is mentioned several times in the thread already just added to an already frustrating situation.

No offence meant :)
None taken! G
 
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